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I started soprano sax 3 monthes ago with Yamaha 4C. I was looking for better MP since I got a little confidence after practice. Recently I have tried runyon custom 6, Bari HR 60, S80 E and Super session F (0.057). SS F is superior to others at every aspect and I like it a lot on my antigua sop. It makes me sound really close to Kenny G's tone which I like most.

I read some posts lately in the form regarding super session facing (tip opening) and it seems that most people prefer larger tips (I,J) to smaller one (E,F,G) and it seems larger tips is easier to blow and control for super session. My embouchure and chop are still quite weak now.( for SS F i can play rico 2.0 reed at most as for comfortability; rico 2.5 is quite hard for me to blow at this stage. As for Bari 60, I can only blow rico 1.5 at most).

So my question is, is the SS F is best for me, or will larger tips opening of SS (like G,or higher) has better results (easier to blow and better sound)? I wanted to order a G or H to compare but I am afraid that my inexperienced level on soprano sax would not help me make decision. I'd like to hear suggestions here first.
 

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If you are not a fully developed soprano saxophone player, my advice would be to stick with the SS-F for a while. I can make my SS-E play with almost the same "presence" as my SS-J, but it requires a different reed (logical, I know).

In MY opinion, the Super Session line (at least on soprano) are terrific mouthpieces and there are probably no reasons at this point for you to change up. Once you develop a solid soprano embouchure, you may want to move up (and I'd say at that point to go all the way - SS-J).

When I play them side-by-side (E and J) like I did yesterday doing some reed-prep stuff, there isn't a HUGE difference, but the J does blow very easily, takes a softer reed (which over the course of a gig may make a difference in endurance), and does provide for a tad more flexibility in expressiveness. If you are having embouchure-related intonation problems, the closer-tipped pieces may make it easier for you to maintain pitch without a lot of lipping up or down. DAVE
 

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I play a SS F , I admit I am not a great player in general or a soprano player in particular. I only find that I need to put more mouthpiece in for the highest notes (no altissimo!) , which I don't really play that often but other than that I am very happy with that opening and reeds between 3 and 3,5. I had read myself the same things about the size of the mouthpieces but a very good player and educator whom I know uses the same mouthpiece in the same opening . By the way, I don't have any problem with my volume, on the contrary!
 

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If you found a mouthpiece and really like it...Just play it!

Down the road, if you really think you would do better with the larger tip opening: Either sell it, or trade it with someone to get what you need. The SuperSessions seem to hold their value well if they are taken care of.

Unless there is a possibility to test the G or H size, then do so. Just buy the one you like best.

I am not a fan of the G-man's style of music, but he has a nice tone and he is a great player.
 

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So my question is, is the SS F is best for me, or will larger tips opening of SS (like G,or higher) has better results (easier to blow and better sound)? I wanted to order a G or H to compare but I am afraid that my inexperienced level on soprano sax would not help me make decision. I'd like to hear suggestions here first.
We dont know whats best for you! Mouthpieces come in different facings because there is no one size fits all solution, individual players have individual preferences. If you like the SS F, then play the SS F, dont get distracted from the main thing which is practice and playing.

If you feel that you are missing something, go try some different ones if you can and see what you like best. If you dont have the opportunity to do that, then pick some up used and trade on the ones that dont cut it.

In general, larger tips can be harder to control for intonation. If you are playing relatively soft reeds is could be you should resist the temptation to trade up to a larger tip size, but there are no hard and fast rules, different reed hardnesses can work better or worse on mouthpieces with the same opening. For example on alto over time Ive found that a RJS 2 soft works best on #7 beechler, but a 3 soft is my choice on a similar size selmer SS. On my vandoren its a 3 medium. You dont know till you try...
 

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I would stick with the Super Session F. As you can see, it will always come down to personal preference in terms of what tip opening players prefer. I used to be a fan of larger tip openings, but for me, they are harder to control. Again, personal preference. I like to have a mouthpiece that is versatile, some of those bigger tip openings its hard to maintain a quality tone, even with jazz, in my opinion. :)
 

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SS F is superior to others at every aspect and I like it a lot on my antigua sop. It makes me sound really close to Kenny G's tone which I like most.

I read some posts lately in the form regarding super session facing (tip opening) and it seems that most people prefer larger tips (I,J) to smaller one (E,F,G)
But maybe those people don't want to sound really close to Kenny G's tone. You have to do what's best for you. It sounds like you know the Super Session F will work for you, and it gives you the tone you're after, so I would stick with it.
 

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curious that I don't sound at all like Mr.G! I am trying to reach a much darker sound and I hope that I am succeeding
 

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For what it's worth...I tried a SS F on my alto with a 2.5/3 reed (don't remember now) and found it a little hard to blow. Loved the sound though so went to a SS E, and now play it regularly and love it. I use a Rico 2.5. Again, alto not soprano, just tossing my 2 cents in.
 

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Wilbur: I had an SS-E for alto (came with my Ref 54) but I handed it down in the family.

I still have an SS-F for alto and it isn't anything like the soprano SS series. The soprano SS pieces are really centered (maybe FOCUSED is a better term) and very full and powerful. My SS-F for alto is just the opposite - warm, spread, but easy to blow like the SS soprano pieces.

I've been curious about the SS-D for alto (being the closest tip-opening for alto SS - others have mentioned it) but I haven't as yet bothered to seek one out, having been satisfied with my alto set-up (an S-80 C* and a Don Sinta HR piece). Of course, it may just be me. DAVE
 

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Wilbur: I had an SS-E for alto (came with my Ref 54) but I handed it down in the family.

I still have an SS-F for alto and it isn't anything like the soprano SS series. The soprano SS pieces are really centered (maybe FOCUSED is a better term) and very full and powerful. My SS-F for alto is just the opposite - warm, spread, but easy to blow like the SS soprano pieces.

I've been curious about the SS-D for alto (being the closest tip-opening for alto SS - others have mentioned it) but I haven't as yet bothered to seek one out, having been satisfied with my alto set-up (an S-80 C* and a Don Sinta HR piece). Of course, it may just be me. DAVE
Dave,

I really like my SuperSession on alto. I get a nice full and warm sound...really fills up the room, so I guess it would be more spread? (Please, no controversy from the spread vs. focus gang) It can also get edgy when pushed, but only if I want it to. I don't play a lot of alto, and the SS is very easy to control for me. I think it is a D. The markings were worn away, but my tech says it measures .77: on the mouthpiece charts, a D is .75...I guess that falls into the +/- .03 range.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone for suggestions! I will stick to and keep working on SS F. I feel that this super session piece is too much good for me as a beginner. It just improve the tone dramatically. My initial goal is to get Dukoff D8 after I developed my skills on sop; now the SS can make the similiar results without putting off too much efforts.

curious that I don't sound at all like Mr.G! I am trying to reach a much darker sound and I hope that I am succeeding
Maybe "sound like Mr.G" is just my personal feeling; maybe it is my illusion. I really like bright/full sound rather than dark sound. I used Yamaha 4C+rovner dark+rico 2.5 in the past three months. A few weeks ago one neighbor told me that my "trumpet playing" improve a lot. I told her it was a sax and she was very surprised. But the other day I recorded "Air on G string" on my mp3 and it sounded totally oboe.
 

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Wilbur: ... My SS-F for alto is just the opposite - warm, spread, but easy to blow like the SS soprano pieces....

DAVE
Re the SS-F it may well have been the reed. I was still tinkering with reeds at the time...the F sounded great, it was just giving me more resistance than I liked...and the horn itself wasn't great either. Change one thing and the sum of all things gets out of balance.
 

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So my question is, is the SS F is best for me, or will larger tips opening of SS (like G,or higher) has better results (easier to blow and better sound)? I wanted to order a G or H to compare but I am afraid that my inexperienced level on soprano sax would not help me make decision. I'd like to hear suggestions here first.
There is really no way to know what tip opening you actually have, unless you measure it.
And tip opening is not the most critical factor in how a soprano piece plays or sounds.

And response and control are deeply affected by other factors not necessarily available to the naked eye.

Most of this well-intentioned advice is likely predicated on a pretty small sample of rather random encounters with this or that anonymous SS piece.

No matter how accurate those assessments, they have almost nothing to do with the "letter" engraved on any particular SS.

And that's before we get to the horn you play !

It's a real journey. Be prepared for it.
 

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I also use a SS-D on alto and really like it. I had a SS-E for soprano and although it had power, I just didn't like the brightness and found it a bit tiring. I guess I am just strange for soprano as I have played it a lot in th past 48 years and a .050" tip is about all I can use.
I agree that you need to just try anything you can. I switched to the Yamaha 4C (cheap plastic) from my Super Session E and like it much better. Differn' strokes.....
 

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I don't doubt that you can sound much brighter than my sound concept on a SS, the other day I shaved a reed a little too much and I was far too bright .......... besides we all , hopefully , sound different!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Today I played the SS F for another few hours, I find the more I play, the less I like it. First of all I am less excited about the tone, meanwhile I find my Yamaha 4C's tone is good as well, though different. Now the problem is the intonation. I find SS is sharper than 4C; so I just put the piece on the neck a little bit instead of pushing it all the way down. Even so it is much harder to control every note in tune, especially in high pitch, than 4C and S-80 E. It tends to be sharper above G3. I guess it is because of my chop. Now I absolutely do not think about trying anything more open than F.
 

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Today I played the SS F for another few hours, I find the more I play, the less I like it. First of all I am less excited about the tone, meanwhile I find my Yamaha 4C's tone is good as well, though different. Now the problem is the intonation. I find SS is sharper than 4C; so I just put the piece on the neck a little bit instead of pushing it all the way down. Even so it is much harder to control every note in tune, especially in high pitch, than 4C and S-80 E. It tends to be sharper above G3. I guess it is because of my chop. Now I absolutely do not think about trying anything more open than F.
I would guess you are going sharp on top due to biting which is a reaction to a too large opening for you at this time. Keep working on the Yamaha, and S-80 and perhaps and in a year or so, maybe venture up to the SS starting with softer reeds. A well developed embouchure can allow a player to play well on a close as well as a wide opening mouthpiece.
 
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