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Selmer Sopranos prior to the early 1980s have always struck me as looking nearly unchanged and really out-dated; it's as though Selmer didn't bother to incorporate the keywork innovations from their other saxes. Sure, there had been some changes along the way since the 1920s (e.g., pearl keys for the G# and F# keys, octave lever shape, low C# tone hole repositioned next to B and Bb tone holes), but I still get the impression that a Mark VI soprano is not all that different from a Modele 22 soprano.

Does anyone have more details to share about the evolution of Selmer's sopranos? Is a Modele 22 soprano significantly different from a Mark VI soprano? Does anyone prefer the older sopranos? I'd love to hear people's thoughts and experiences.
 

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Most soprano saxophones stayed rather unchanged for a very long time until the ’80 and Selmer was rather more at the forefront of this change rather than being a conservative brand. They inspired change for many brands although I think that Yamaha took steps of their own for the more modern (compared to the Mark VI) 61.

I personally don’t like the Mark VI soprano ( I haven’t tried earlier models) and prefer Couesnon and SML sopranos despite their relative primitivism. I have also found a late Borgani (with curved non interchangeable neck) to be an excellent instrument.

The SA 80 and SA80 II are certainly modern sopranos but rather complicated and heavier compared to Yamaha and Yanagisawa ( the latter after they abandoned the copying of the Mark VI) and just a tad lighter and smaller and more ergonomic of the Keilwerth Late Toneking or early SX.
 
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