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Hi everyone,
Does anyone play with a Selmer soloist vintage on his soprano sax? If yes, what is the tip opening ? What are the qualities and the drawbacks of this mouthpiece? What would be an equivalent amongst the modern mouthpieces? The Selmer Concept?
Thanks a lot.
 

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I use a vintage Selmer Scroll Shank on my soprano, which isn't labeled "Soloist" but is considered "Soloist-style." I use a size "E" which is around a 0.053" tip opening (haven't had it measured to see what it is for sure). I haven't played many soprano mouthpieces but I can say that I have better intonation on this than on a newer metal Link which I used to use. I also like it better than the newer Selmer S80 pieces, to me it has a warmer sound.

Here is Theo Wanne's descriptive page on Selmer mouthpieces: https://theowanne.com/knowledge/mouthpiece-museum/selmer-mouthpieces/
According to him the Concept is a completely different mouthpiece. The modern equivalent of a Soloist would be the Soloist "New Edition," but even better for soprano would be the Super Session which is a reissue of the Soloist Soprano piece.
 

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Soloists on soprano can be great. However, the Selmer S80 series is also excellent. Many pros use them on soprano for all playing styles. I still have my S80 D from college 25 years ago and I have a Doc Tenney S80 D that I have used as my main soprano piece for about 10 years now. I use my S80 for everything - classical, jazz, pit work and even for cheesier pop stuff that I do on rare occasions.
 

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I have a soprano Selmer scroll-shank C* (not marked Soloist; some say it is an Airflow, but I don't know - and don't really care) that I bought new in 1957. I have it on my five-digit MKVI right now. I'm using a Legere #2 synthetic reed with that mouthpiece, cane (Vandoren and Alexander #2) with the others.

I also have, as current mouthpieces in use, a Vandoren SL3 and a Selmer S-80 D worked on by Joe Giardullo of SopranoPlanet. All of those close-tip mouthpieces sound a BIT different when I play them, but all play very nicely and I'm STILL undecided as to which one I use when it is time for serious playing. That depends on the room, the size of the ensemble, and the cane reed I'm using that day.

I also have other sopranos in my closet that I routinely use, and with the same mouthpieces.

For years, I played open-tip soprano mouthpieces, but recently switched to the closer tips. As far as the playing characteristics of the scroll-shank, that comes from me and probably will not be the same when you play it. Suffice to say that I like the sound I get from it with the Legere reed. DAVE
 

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I currently play the Mouthpiece Café Espresso on soprano, which is modeled after the soloist design, in a .065 tip. It's had the throat opened up so it's no longer a small chamber design. I feel that is an awesome improvement to the original design. It keeps the the quick response and tight core sound of the original, but removes some of the issues with back pressure that can come up with the smaller chamber.

I've also had the pleasure of playing both the hr and metal soloists. I've found that anything well-made within that design is going to have a very immediate, stable, tonal response across most of the horn's range. Super Sessions are Selmer's modern equivalent of the old model. I think they still sell the metal soloist, but the quality is not nearly so consistent.
 

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Hi everyone,
Does anyone play with a Selmer soloist vintage on his soprano sax? If yes, what is the tip opening ? What are the qualities and the drawbacks of this mouthpiece? What would be an equivalent amongst the modern mouthpieces? The Selmer Concept?
Thanks a lot.
These are great pieces if you can find one. They are focused, nice and dark and play well in tune. I make a piece that I used the same concepts as the Soloist but with a lower baffle. This makes the high notes fatter and more in tune and it's nice and dark. Good luck finding one. Phil Barone
 

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I have a beautiful Soloist C* that I used for years on my Mk6 soprano, but I have found that the very small throat of the Soloist makes the top C,C#,D very flat on modern sopranos. I used mine for a while on my Series 3 and gave it a chance on my Sequoia, but in the end I found Vandorens and more recently Ed Pillinger's Lelandais style piece better matches tuning-wise, I also find the Concept soprano piece to be flat at the top.
 

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I guess I’m one of the few who prefers S-80s to the scroll shank. Lelandais soprano mouthpieces are are really nice too. I found them brighter than Selmer mouthpieces.
I play the S-80 D that came with my MarkVI but I also have an F I use sometimes.
As little as I play soprano I want something that plays in tune easily.
 

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I guess I’m one of the few who prefers S-80s to the scroll shank. Lelandais soprano mouthpieces are are really nice too. I found them brighter than Selmer mouthpieces.
I play the S-80 D that came with my MarkVI but I also have an F I use sometimes.
As little as I play soprano I want something that plays in tune easily.
The S80 is also an excellent mouthpiece. It's one of those pieces that you can pick up and play and not have to worry about it. It's very even and free-blowing. The older ones are a little less friendly but a wonderful sound. If you double than the S80 is a better choice. Phil Barone
 

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like others have said S80's are fabulous, especially given their relatively low cost.
Ted Klum makes a superb soloist inspired soprano mouthpiece which he can tailor to your needs. Absolutely beautiful sound, but like DaveR mentioned, not every mouthpiece tunes well up high on some modern horns. I find this with my Klum on my Yani soprano.
 

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like others have said S80's are fabulous, especially given their relatively low cost. I played one for nearly well over 15 years before it was worn out.
Ted Klum makes a superb soloist inspired soprano mouthpiece which he can tailor to your needs. Absolutely beautiful sound, but like DaveR mentioned, not every mouthpiece tunes well up high on some modern horns. I find this with my Klum on my Yani soprano.
 

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Interesting thread.
I have always preferred and come back to Scroll Shank Selmer Soloist.
I have owned a E,D C *
Wished that I ve kept the real original Soloist,,but there gone.
Still on a C* Scroll Shank that Joe G. refaced for me,and did a great job,,but always wondering if i could find a better Selmer one ,,one day..
Will have to try the S80 D one day!
All the best
Mario
 

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I have several Selmer soprano mouthpieces, most of which are good players.

In Super Session, I have two E's and two J's (I used to have three SS-J's but gifted one to Bruce Brennan ["olhonker"], an SOTW member).

In S-80, I have several ranging from C* to J (including two G's, two J's, and three E's), and one scroll-shank Soloist-style C*.

Among the S-80's, most play well, but among the three S-80 E's, one is fine, the other two are notably inferior. AND, the S-80 D was unplayable. So, I sent the S-80 D to Joe Giardullo at SopranoPlanet and he worked his magic on the S-80 D. Wow, does it play good now. I rank it among my best, if not THE best Selmer soprano mouthpieces.

My three Super Session J's were so similar I could not decide which one was best. And for the most part, I've had similar experiences with Selmer's other soprano pieces. So while I've experienced some inconsistencies among various Selmer soprano mouthpieces, they have been more consistent than inconsistent.

In MY experience with them, I've found the S-80 C* to be more powerful than the scroll-shank C*. Oh, the scroll-shank is a fine mouthpiece, it is just that for me, I like the S-80 version better. Others may have the opposite experience. In comparing the Super Session E to the S-80 E, and the Super Session J to the S-80 J, it is a toss-up for me. They both (Super Session and S-80) have their strong points - different yet comparable. It is just one of those things - maybe the chosen reed is what separates them but even that changes when the reed changes. DAVE
 

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Woww Dave
You sure have a lot if soprano mpcs!
Man,i gota get one if those S80..soon
Thanks again
Mario
 

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I have several Selmer soprano mouthpieces, most of which are good players.

In Super Session, I have two E's and two J's (I used to have three SS-J's but gifted one to Bruce Brennan ["olhonker"], an SOTW member).

In S-80, I have several ranging from C* to J (including two G's, two J's, and three E's), and one scroll-shank Soloist-style C*.

Among the S-80's, most play well, but among the three S-80 E's, one is fine, the other two are notably inferior. AND, the S-80 D was unplayable. So, I sent the S-80 D to Joe Giardullo at SopranoPlanet and he worked his magic on the S-80 D. Wow, does it play good now. I rank it among my best, if not THE best Selmer soprano mouthpieces.

My three Super Session J's were so similar I could not decide which one was best. And for the most part, I've had similar experiences with Selmer's other soprano pieces. So while I've experienced some inconsistencies among various Selmer soprano mouthpieces, they have been more consistent than inconsistent.

In MY experience with them, I've found the S-80 C* to be more powerful than the scroll-shank C*. Oh, the scroll-shank is a fine mouthpiece, it is just that for me, I like the S-80 version better. Others may have the opposite experience. In comparing the Super Session E to the S-80 E, and the Super Session J to the S-80 J, it is a toss-up for me. They both (Super Session and S-80) have their strong points - different yet comparable. It is just one of those things - maybe the chosen reed is what separates them but even that changes when the reed changes. DAVE
Dave, you have a nice collection and Selmer made great soprano mouthpieces. I copied an old scroll shank but I made the baffle lower in an attempt to make the high notes fatter and more in tune but if you have a good Selmer it's all you need. A very reliable mouthpiece and a workhorse. Phil Barone
 

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I just laid out on an Aizen Soloist copy.
I wish I had seen all this love for the S80’earlier.
This Aizen is a far more open tip so maybe it’ll work better for me.
If not I’ll certainly try the Selmer piece.
 

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B Flat: I've been through quite a few "favorite" soprano mouthpieces over the years and now my mouthpiece boxes are filled with various brands and designs. I used to be sold on the open-tips (in the .070 range) but lately I have dialed it back a lot.

When the Selmer Super Session first hit the market and I compared it to my S-80 J's, I thought I'd finally found THE piece. But like many (some?) of us, I kept looking and decided the Morgan Vintages and Phil-Tone Sapphires were even better.

Before I bought a SopranoPlanet Missing Link and the Sapphire, I'd stuck with stock pieces - like the run-of-the-mill Selmers and Link STM's, etc. I had not ventured into the custom-made pieces.

At this point, I've concluded they are all good and my satisfaction with any of them was more about the individual reed I was using that day, rather than the individual mouthpiece. Of all the mouthpieces I have, I could make any one of them work, if necessary. But for me, it ISN'T necessary and I enjoy having a variety of pieces handy and occasionally lining them all up and giving them a go with whatever reed I'm enjoying at the moment. Oh, the joy of retirement. DAVE
 

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Not specific to the scroll shank Soloist, or even to soprano, but my experience with Selmer MPs has certainly been very positive.

I currently have 4:

S-80 C* soprano - very nice MP, but I would like a bit darker sound
Soloist C* alto - superb MP, suitable for darn near anything on my Conn 6M, but can't quite compete at the loudest volumes.
Soloist C* tenor - very nice MP, but I like the additional cut I get from the Meyer I use as my primary on tenor (but I don't play much tenor anyway)
S-80 bass - Man, is this ever a good mouthpiece. It does not have the square chamber of the other S-80s. Plays great, great sound. Very well made. Comparing the workmanship to many other pieces (just visually) you can really see the difference.
 

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Selmer soprano mpcs has alway been again my favorite.
I have one,but looking for a S80 in E,or F opening.
For soprano,i think they are very nice...
Today,i ve played both of my sop. mpcs,,yana Metal 8 and again my Selmer Scroll Shank..
Selmer feels like home for me,.
All the best
Saxobari
 
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