Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
42,136 Posts
funny you should say so but I just got a C (not mint.......) and I am trying to decide what to do with it, whether to keep it or sell it.....
 

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
42,136 Posts
Short Shank Soprano soloist don't have the word soloist on the table but the indication of the opening is in a vertical oval as opposed to the horizontal oval of the airflow

form the " Mouthpiece museum"

 

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
42,136 Posts
it is true that there is not a long shank soprano soloist but it is just a matter of terminology to indicate a certain type which went along with the short shanks for alto, tenor and baritone and at the time when all these were made they were part of a congruous series
 

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
42,136 Posts
There isn鈥檛 actually a true short shank 鈥 soloist鈥 model for soprano ( with for example the words soloist on the table) , the one we normally call like that is called like that to differentiate it from the 鈥 airflow鈥. y the way there isn鈥檛 a long-shank soloist soprano either all this confusion is because we carry the name of the other contemporary and similar looking series to the soprano too.

The difference which helps spotting one versus the other is that the indication of the opening in the soloist is written in a vertical oval as opposed to a horizontal oval.

The so called soloist ( seen the model is identified like this only because of continuity reasons but it was not stamped as such) has an improved (smaller) and updated chamber compared to the one airflow but none of them has a D shaped throat.

Both have round throats and chambers and aside for the oval thing I mentioned they are hard to distinguish.

I am sure that your 鈥 soloist鈥 will play very well, I am not sure what that means for contemporary/classical style music. I suppose the advise that I received from a fellow member when I came to SOTW stands for these too.

Somebody told me that a Jazz mouthpiece is a mouthpiece that you play Jazz with. So, you know what I am going to say right? A contemporary/classical mouthpiece is one your play contemporary/classical music with.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top