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Discussion Starter #1
I was wonder how these mouthpiece compare to each other. Did anyone ever try them all with similar tip openings. How does their tone and response compare to each other. I have a soloist style "D" and love but i wanted to try out its predecessor but these mouthpieces dont really come in cheap.
 

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I play a Soloist Style D opened by Brian Powell to .105. It has a gorgeous sound to it. Deep complex and dark.
I also have a Short Shank .105 and .100 both refaced by Brian Powell. They play a little different from one another and also
different from the Soloist Style. The SS for me play with a bit more edge and although they have a complex tone are lacking something the Soloist Style has but I can't put my finger on it. I play them on a 1967 MKV1 and these Soloists were made for this horn..meaning the Selmer horns. In my opinion they are great mouthpieces and I actually prefer them over Otto Links.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
haha, that is exactly how i feel, the short shank i tried has an edge to it but theres something to it that i like but i am not sure what.
 

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I don't like the horseshoe throat. I do like them when you work the throat out to a large throat aka "true large chamber" as per TW's denomination.
 

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I feel that the short shank is a little more lively and a tad more free blowing. Executed properly both can be great pieces.

Personally, I like a round chamber more than a horseshoe but there is no discounting the quality of a good soloist.
 

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SOTW Columnist and Forum Contributor 2015-2016
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The differences are:

One has a short shank, one has a long shank, and one of them has style.

- Saxaholic
 

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I have an original Soloist Style E that came with my Mark VI Alto and I ignored it for ages but recently cleaned the orange oxidation off it and tried it and man does it have something.

A big low end and great Altissimo and it can be pushed to be edgy as well, a great mouthpiece.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Can anyone give me an estimation to how much a selmer soloist long shank c and short shank c cost?
 

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How do the old LT Larrt Teal models compare? I know that they have a round chamber but the blank looks pretty similar.
 

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I prefer the long shanks because they're cheaper. The extra rubber, which is considerable on tenor, makes them a little darker, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I prefer the long shanks because they're cheaper. The extra rubber, which is considerable on tenor, makes them a little darker, IMO.
I got lucky i guessed, I picked up like 2 short shanks with like beat up conns before. After I sold the mouthpiece I pretty much got the horn for free.
 

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I also think the shorty is the better mouthpiece....less stuffy but for some tenors, you really need the long one to get it to not fall off. I would put equal long shanks (vintage) to be worth under $100 and shorties at $350+ for alto. In a D or larger a shortie could fetch a lot more. I think a shory E sold for nearly $700 on ebay a while back. I have a C* shorty and it is still a great mouthpiece although I never use it now. The LT is a fairly closed mouthpiece with a small round chamber. Never liked them myself, too much work to play. I think most of the scroll LTs were long shanks although I recall them being around prior to 1966ish when the shorties stopped.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I also think the shorty is the better mouthpiece....less stuffy but for some tenors, you really need the long one to get it to not fall off. I would put equal long shanks (vintage) to be worth under $100 and shorties at $350+ for alto. In a D or larger a shortie could fetch a lot more. I think a shory E sold for nearly $700 on ebay a while back. I have a C* shorty and it is still a great mouthpiece although I never use it now. The LT is a fairly closed mouthpiece with a small round chamber. Never liked them myself, too much work to play. I think most of the scroll LTs were long shanks although I recall them being around prior to 1966ish when the shorties stopped.
Bruce how much is a soloist style worth then if the long shanks are worth under 100
 

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I can only guess (from ebay auctions) that for a long shank soloist style vintage about $65-85 and if it is a soloist, maybe $100+. Just a guess. There are a lot around so the prices stay pretty decent.
 
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