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Im with jazzmancan on this, im afraid to say.

There are two versions of the actual soloist. the short and long shank. the short shank is the earlier version. the long shank soloist is the version just before yours. which is often called soloist, in error.
yours is from the 70s and is the version up to the introduction of the S80 pieces

The actual soloists have the word SOLOIST on the table, written at an angle. then the lay is written just below that. no triangle.

the new tip opening of yours is somewhere between an e and an f. so, desireable. and the Klum name will help.

but these are not as sought after as Soloists.
 

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The third one is what people refer to as the "airflow". How does that compare to the Soloists?
Yes, folks do refer to these are "airflow"

but strictly speaking.... they shouldnt!!!!

there was an earlier version which had AIRFLOW stamped on the table. I used to have a few. may still have some, im not sure!!

depends how pedantic we are going to be.

I really like these. they are darker than soloists, and possibly a bit more resistant. this one was a D . I had Morgan Fry open it to an E. .78. It plays fantastic now. has that short shank ring, but darker.

I have an original e in tenor, which I also love.

on alto I like this version and the short shank. hard to choose. ( I also had Morgan open a short shank to .78, E. love them both )

on tenor, I much prefer this version over the later Soloist versions
 

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OK. The Airflow is a very, very different mouthpiece than the Soloist. If the piece has a round "squeeze" chamber, a slightly shorter shank like the one you have on the right, it's an Airflow, regardless of whether it has the stamp on on it or not.

In fact, Ted has this wrong on his website, BTW, the LATER ones have "Air-flow" stamped on them to distinguish them from short shank Soloists. I have actually found long shank mouthpieces marked Airflow, which actually wouldn't have happened if the earlier supposition the the early ones were the marked ones.

You have to remember that up until the advent of the Soloist, Selmer only made two mouthpieces: what would come to be known as the Airflow and the metal classics. After they released the first short shank Soloists in 1960, they started stamping the round chambered ones "Air Flow". When Selmer started to phase out the AirFlow, Larry Teal asked them if they were still going to make a round chambered piece, so they did and named it after him.

The ones that should NOT be called Airflows are the earlier "barrel chambered" ones with either the scroll engraving or the metal rings. These were NEVER marketed as Airflows. They should be called "table" or pre-Airflow.

I have done a silly amount of research on this subject, and my main mouthpieces on alto and soprano are actually Airflow pieces.

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Some very interesting stuff there, which ive not read before, and which is contrary to what i thought.

Ive always believed that the version i have ran in to the short shank, with nothing in between. This in the mid 50s.
You mention 1960 as being the change over time.

Here is a link to Theo wannes article about these.He says 1956 as the change date, and mentions that the words air flow were on the earlier version.
Some of his statements dont always ring true with me, but it is interesting info anyway.

https://theowanne.com/knowledge/mouthpiece-museum/selmer-mouthpieces/

All very confusing.

You mention someone called Ted, and his website. Could you give a Links to that. It would be very interesting to have some definitive info on these historical pieces.
 
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