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Hello!
About 10 years ago I bought a MK VI that came with a silver neck (see pictures). I am trying to identify what type of neck this is. Is this a "Selmer Paris Mark VI replacement neck" or what else? Can anybody tell?
Thanks in advance!
Andy
 

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Is there a serial number on it? It is definitely plated, and not sterling, silver (sterling has gold-colored octave key). It could be original to another (silver-plated) horn, or replacement. It is definitely Selmer Paris.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Hello!
About 10 years ago I bought a MK VI that came with a silver neck (see pictures). I am trying to identify what type of neck this is. Is this a "Selmer Paris Mark VI replacement neck" or what else? Can anybody tell?
Yes, it looks very much like a proper MKVI neck, mostly likely off a different horn rather than a factory replacement as you'd expect someone to get a lacquered neck replacement if it is for a lacquered horn.
 

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BTW, the badge with crosshatching in the circle places it in the Mark VI era, so it is a real VI neck, and not a later replacement.
The factory replacement MK VI necks also were correct in every sense, so that does not make this neck an original. This neck is an original Selmer Paris MK VI neck from a silver-plated MK VI. I can say that with certainty because of several obvious 'tells' visible in the pictures. Andy should take the octave key off and look on the bottom of it for a three-digit number hand-scratched in the big area (underneath the big 'S' on the to). This is the last three digits of the serial number of the sax it came with. Further, this neck came on a sax from the middle to late period of the MK VI and is probably a very good-playing one. Mr. Brecker used such a silver-plated neck on his tenor. The neck looks to be in original condition with no previous damage and is probably worth around $400 or more. Depending on who needs one and how bad they want it, it could sell for $1000 or more. I bought one like this for an earlier MK VI for $350 about ten years ago, ended up giving it to my son who didn't like it either so I put it on ebay and got $1250. I took back my original $350 and gave my son the rest of it because his horn needed an overhaul. Pretty nice deal!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Uhmmm ... I took the octave key off and looked on the bottom of it for the three-digit number. I was expecting to see a number. Well ... there is no number hand-scratched in the big area underneath the big 'S' :-0
Does it mean something? The MKVI it was coming with is a 1956 #6808x.
 

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My French assembled tenor neck has the last digits pencil etched right in the inside of the neck. You can barely see it and would need a bright light to find it. Not sure if it would be there but maybe worth a look?
 

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I stated something wrong above; the neck I had was from an earlier MK VI which is what made it so valuable, plus it was basically perfect. You can tell right away whether a neck is of the original design or the revised design. Measure from the lower point of the brace to the top of the tenon stop ring - the early one is about 1/8" and the later one is about 3/8". You can see in the middle picture above that the clearance is more than 1/8" so the neck is of the mid-late period as I said. The neck also may have originally been on a 'French' Selmer (one that was not shipped to Selmer USA for sale here) - these did not have serial numbers on the neck. Also, Selmer USA stopped putting serial numbers on Paris sax necks around 1967 (#140000). The last-three-digits of serial numbers I referred to are numbers that Selmer still scratches on many parts just to keep the parts together because of the hand-fitting involved in sax assembly. It is true that sometimes the numbers were scratched inside the neck tenon instead of under the rocker. Frequently the inside numbers are never noticed by the owner and can be nearly invisible after many years of use.
Also, I realized that I cannot be certain that this neck is not a factory replacement neck. If it is, it would not have any numbers at all. It is certainly reasonable to assume that Selmer Paris supplied replacement necks in any finish option to match the saxes at least during the MK VI era, and probably for several years later. The neck in question is most likely on a lacquered sax because the previous owner needed a neck and found the silver one to play well on it.
So, Andrea, if you really don't like the color mismatch, just watch Brecker videos until you can accept that the appearance of the horn just doesn't matter. :bluewink:

I have recently become quite happy with the silver-neck/lacquered-sax combination, but I prefer Sterling silver. This is probably because my first tenor (1961) was an older King Super 20 with silver neck - I just always liked that combo, and here it is with my MK VI and Series III Sterling neck:
 

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so why doesnt anyone list the whole serial numbers? do they turn up reported stolen? is there some other scam people pull?
 

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yes
 
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