Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008-2017
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I never play classical, and need your input. I do not believe that a Series II has to be a classical intended saxophone.

Actually I do not think there exist such a thing like a blues or rock and roll saxophone...

Is it true that classical players prefer a Series II over a Series III? Because of a darker tone?

All the best,

JI
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,147 Posts
There are plenty of people paying both IIs and IIIs. I use a II, but only because it is much darker, and I need a dark setup to sound good. I think it is possible to get a good classical sound on any horn, but it is much easier to get it on some horns than others, like a Yamaha EX vs a Super 20 or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Yeah, I think generally that is how the preference goes because of the darkness of the IIs. That said several top classical players prefer the III as well as top jazz players that like the II.
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
637 Posts
I get a darker, clearer tone out of the Series III vs. the Series II but that's me...... So yea..... I mean personally if I were going for a selmer I'd probably go with a III.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Dannel-
You can't say Selmers are dark at FSU. Edit quick before someone else from Tallahassee reads that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Pretty much everyone here at NCSA plays on a Series III Alto (so does the professor), and they all sound really good to me :O
I mean, I think the mouthpiece matters more so than the horn, I bet you could get a pretty good Jazz sound if you wanted from a Serie II but what do i know!!
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2013-2016
Joined
·
7,887 Posts
The Serie II is a very flexible horn, as is the III. They can pretty much handle anything that you throw at them, given the right mouthpiece/reed setup.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008-2017
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Why dark sound is classical related?

Thanxs for the replies.

I really want to know why is a dark sound so strongly vinculated with a classical sound?

All the best,

JI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
I don't think classical sound and dark sound are related at all, I mean there are classical players with dark sounds, but there are also classical players with bright sounds that still sound good ;o
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2013-2016
Joined
·
7,887 Posts
zorroperro said:
Thanxs for the replies.

I really want to know why is a dark sound so strongly vinculated with a classical sound?

All the best,

JI

Because that is how it developed. Think of a guitar, as a more extreme example. If distortion pedals were around when classical music was written, classical guitar might have a very different sound.

Now, that being said, not every classical player has a super dark sound (think Eugene Rousseau vs. John Edward Kelly)...but most have a darker sound than a typical jazz player.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Yes, both can be great horns, just have to find the right one. I played both serie II and III, and am amazed at the difference between several horns of the same model. Some just have bad tuning, really resistant, really freeblowing, etc. My teachers serie II is more freeblowing than my own III and mines a pretty decent example of a III.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2013-2016
Joined
·
7,887 Posts
Demolisher_2000 said:
Yes, both can be great horns, just have to find the right one. I played both serie II and III, and am amazed at the difference between several horns of the same model. Some just have bad tuning, really resistant, really freeblowing, etc. My teachers serie II is more freeblowing than my own III and mines a pretty decent example of a III.
This is very true, and even more so with earlier Selmer models. Vince Gnojek at KU had the most freeblowing Mark VI tenor I've ever played. He let me play it once vs. his old VI, and a VII (which I owned at the time). I couldn't believe the difference in the responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
J.Max said:
This is very true, and even more so with earlier Selmer models. Vince Gnojek at KU had the most freeblowing Mark VI tenor I've ever played. He let me play it once vs. his old VI, and a VII (which I owned at the time). I couldn't believe the difference in the responses.
I know! Ive had two people in the past week (both have great examples of series II, great intonation, solid horns) try my horn and say they want my horn! But then again, they didnt try my teachers series II which is simply great. And I just tried a 5 digit mark VI (transitional one with some things that are from the SBA) and I didnt think it was a great example... Even though its a 5 digit MK VI. The person who owned it did a side by side with their vintage 62(silkscreen logo), in the end, the player sounds like the player.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2013-2016
Joined
·
7,887 Posts
Steve P said:
Gnojek eh? I went to school with his son....
Yeah, I took lessons from him for a little while when I was in high school. He has some...interesting ideas about the saxophone.

You've also mentioned that you went to school with Anna Marie Wytko. Do you have some sort of connection to the state of Kansas? ;)
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top