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Discussion Starter #1
I have a very nice Selmer USA Omega 162 alto that is a bit stubborn popping the G up when I hit the octave key. And only the G. Most times I can just change my embouchure to get the octave but I shouldn't have to. If I don't change my embouchure I get no octave or I get the halfway "warble".

It isn't the mouthpiece or reed, as these work well on my Buffet alto and I've tried both an S80 "C*" mouthpiece and a Super Session "E" on the Omega with similar results.

I've checked for leaks and massaged pads, everything appears tight, and I cleaned out the body octave pip. The octave pads function well as best I can tell, the heights look perfect.

What else should I be looking for?
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Did you check neck octave definitely closing when playing G2? Not that I think this is the problem -it actually would go the other way, but just really focus on the action of the octaves. Is the sax clean inside and out and lubed? Have you checked for a broken spring or one off it's perch?
I'm also an Omega owner - bought mine in 1983. Many saxes have this tendency and some techs have advised opening the body vent a small amount. I'd like to leave them as Selmer made them but that doesn't mean you can't find out what that diameter is and run a bit of that size through it to make sure the vent has not narrowed from a hard build-up.
Something else you can do even less intrusive is to run a pipe cleaner through the vent (requires disassembly of the octave mechanism) with some 'Lime-Away' on it which will dissolve hard corrosion or build-up. Also good to do this on the neck vent.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, neck octave is good - I even checked it by holding it shut while going from G1 to G2. Also did that for the side keys. No difference on either. And I ran a brush thru the body octave pip.

Sax is clean, keys all move well, springs all seem to be there and working. Neck fit is tight. The whole thing plays really well - except for this little flaw.

When it gets dark I'll hit it with the leak light again in total darkness - I'm convinced there has to be a teeny leak somewhere.
 

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It is not necessarily an issue with this instrument. It may be a combination of the design of this alto with your playing habits.
For example, I've experienced a similar warble (to a lesser degree) with several well serviced Selmer super action series II, but not with my own older super action 80 "series I". When I get used to them (after ~ 30 mn of playing) the problem disappears because I'm slightly altering my default embouchure and the way I approach this note.
Try to see wether the problem still occurs when you change a bit your playing position (within reason, don't try uncomfortable positions):
-raise or lower the neck strap
-vary the amount of mouthpiece you take in the mouth
-position and tonicity of the lower lip
-head tilting
-are you playing more on one side of the mouthpiece
-position of the tongue in the mouth
-air support,...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Found it! The pad above the left hand B key had hardly even a HAIRLINE leak on a side I couldn't easily see, and the reflection from the B tone hole hid the extremely faint glimmer coming from that leaking pad.

Wow, it fixed the G octave thing and made my palm keys speak much more easily (they weren't bad before, but now - wow!). I am pretty impressed with this horn. It needs new pads, but now I am convinced it will be worth the effort. Great horn! My Buffet SDA may finally have some competition............
 

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Fixing leaks has amazing results.
 
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