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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
the recordings are not of any great quality that one can tell much about the quality of the flute ( while we can certainly hear that the player @Robert Are is a very good one) based on this, the sound appears rather tinny and thin but is it the flute or the recording? and would another fuse sound differently played by the same player ?

I often visit Matthew’s and the owner is a flute player who used to play concerts for a large part of his life. Often customers on a flute quest try several flutes , occasionally they ask opinions about the sound. Some players obviously benefit from changing from one flute to another (and interestingly not always in a univocal way that one can say it is the flute but sometimes a flute performs better in some hands than some others).

You really need to go to a place where there are many flutes to try of this would be a lucky shot attempt based only on price and brand.
Thanks Milandro. I do wish I had a better recording of the flute. I guess I could sit down and just record some solo flute, lol. But I hear what you hear - that it sounds tinny and thin.

Honestly it never even occurred to me until recently to consider another flute. The trigger was retiring and as we've been decluttering and selling and giving away a lifetime's worth of stuff... including me selling off quite a few guitars and basses and PA equipment that the thought occurred to me that I could put the money from the sale of music equipment into another flute.

Where is Matthews?
 

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Mattew’s is in the NL, so a bit out of your usual range, they do sell a lot abroad ( see also Davy Holland on ebay) but then the option of trying is not there for you.

I am sure you would benefit from buying a modern flute, whatever takes your fancy, ideally you should try before you buy, the options are endless , but you can get caught in the options loop and never come out of the indecision impasse.

Maybe deciding from the start for a good brand and a good model fitting your requirements may be the best first step towards getting a new flute! Try to find a secondhand flute of your dreams!

Good luck!
 
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selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
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Thanks Milandro. I do wish I had a better recording of the flute. I guess I could sit down and just record some solo flute, lol. But I hear what you hear - that it sounds tinny and thin.

Honestly it never even occurred to me until recently to consider another flute. The trigger was retiring and as we've been decluttering and selling and giving away a lifetime's worth of stuff... including me selling off quite a few guitars and basses and PA equipment that the thought occurred to me that I could put the money from the sale of music equipment into another flute.

Where is Matthews?
The only thing that reminds me of a Lot is the inline G. Keys look rather cheap, and no Lot ever had adjustment screws, which are generally not found above intermediate grade instruments. It is fairly easy to tell a solid silver flue from a plated one. There are several "tells". If you tap a silver head with your finger, it makes a dull thunk. Plated is a higher "tink“, with a ring to it. Check the end of the head where it goes into the tenon. Often the silver plate is worn away and you can see a duller metal in patches.

If you hold the body at the tenon and tap the end of the flute, and it is silver, you will feel a bit of a vibration that dies away quickly. But if it is plated it will feel much stiffer and deader, with no appreciable vibration. If you have ever tried this you will know the difference, but it is hard to describe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
The only thing that reminds me of a Lot is the inline G. Keys look rather cheap, and no Lot ever had adjustment screws, which are generally not found above intermediate grade instruments. It is fairly easy to tell a solid silver flue from a plated one. There are several "tells". If you tap a silver head with your finger, it makes a dull thunk. Plated is a higher "tink“, with a ring to it. Check the end of the head where it goes into the tenon. Often the silver plate is worn away and you can see a duller metal in patches.

If you hold the body at the tenon and tap the end of the flute, and it is silver, you will feel a bit of a vibration that dies away quickly. But if it is plated it will feel much stiffer and deader, with no appreciable vibration. If you have ever tried this you will know the difference, but it is hard to describe.
Thanks for the response!
So... it thunks - even if I tap it with a piece of metal it still tunks. There is no ringing. I've had the flute for 45 years now. There is no wearing away of metal anywhere. There are no dull patches. It polishes up as nice and shiny as the day I got it. Not sure about the vibration, I don't feel one but not sure if I'm doing it right or not. I don't think the keys are cheap - I would think that after so many years if they were they'd have worn away or broken or something? This flute has been played a lot... not just in the 45 years I've owned it but in the decades my teacher owned it before that... and I assume by whoever owned it before him.

BTW - I wasn't told it was a Lot. Selmer made copies of Lots back in the day. In the 1930s they were competing for the professional market (unlike today).

I'm going to go down to Flute Center of NY in the fall. I figure they can probably settle the matter one way or the other.
 

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Thanks for the response!
So... it thunks - even if I tap it with a piece of metal it still tunks. There is no ringing. I've had the flute for 45 years now. There is no wearing away of metal anywhere. There are no dull patches. It polishes up as nice and shiny as the day I got it. Not sure about the vibration, I don't feel one but not sure if I'm doing it right or not. I don't think the keys are cheap - I would think that after so many years if they were they'd have worn away or broken or something? This flute has been played a lot... not just in the 45 years I've owned it but in the decades my teacher owned it before that... and I assume by whoever owned it before him.

BTW - I wasn't told it was a Lot. Selmer made copies of Lots back in the day. In the 1930s they were competing for the professional market (unlike today).

I'm going to go down to Flute Center of NY in the fall. I figure they can probably settle the matter one way or the other.
Probably is solid silver. Still, very strange to do a Lot reproduction and use Y arms, and put adjustment screws on as well, which were never on a Lot flute. It is inline, which is unusual in my experience in a flute like this. Of course Haynes and Powell did inline on their handmade flutes, but those were always with pointed arms. Very odd to see Y arms inline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Probably is solid silver. Still, very strange to do a Lot reproduction and use Y arms, and put adjustment screws on as well, which were never on a Lot flute. It is inline, which is unusual in my experience in a flute like this. Of course Haynes and Powell did inline on their handmade flutes, but those were always with pointed arms. Very odd to see Y arms inline.
This flute seems to be a bit of a mystery. From what you and others say it is probably not a Lot copy. Maybe its a one-off from that time or maybe they experimented with different models that never caught on? I'm not sure if you saw where I posted that even Conn-Selmer did a search of their records for me and couldn't find any info on the model # or any other details - apparently they either lost or never took very good care of their records back then.
 
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