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Discussion Starter #1
When I first started out playing, I was very lucky to come across a MkVI tenor in a guitar shop in Edinburgh. I paid the princely sum of £250 for it, this was back in 1978. The distinctive feature of this horn was that it had silver plated keys (proper silver, not nickel) - in many ways identical to the one that Dexter was holding on the cover of "Homecoming". This was, apparently a very good instrument, as I found out when I went on Jazz courses and tutors attempted to get me to sell the instrument to them.
A good few years ago (at least 20) I went to visit a friend in Los Angeles where I managed to get it stolen. I reported it to the police and eventually got the insurance. However, the interesting thing is, when I first joined this forum, I entered the serial number into the search engine and it came up!!

I have given up the idea of trying to get it back, but it poses an interesting dilemma. I guess it might just be possible to track its' progress...maybe even to the present owner...who knows?

Now, I have thought about this quite a lot, do I still have any rights to this horn because it was stolen from me?

I'm sure there must be a range of opinions on this....
 

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I reported it to the police and eventually got the insurance.

Now, I have thought about this quite a lot, do I still have any rights to this horn because it was stolen from me?
If you accepted the insurance payout, the party that has a claim to the horn is the insurance company. You should report it to them.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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If you accepted the insurance payout, the party that has a claim to the horn is the insurance company. You should report it to them.
This is absolutely correct and possibly worth doing if you want that horn back. Obviously you would now have to pay for it if you buy it from the insurance company, and the person who now thinks they own it will lose the horn.

That is a a bit sad if they weren't the thief, and bought it in good faith not knowing it was stolen property.
 

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Yes, once stolen, subsequent owners have no real ownership, even if their acquisition did not involve intent to receive stolen property - and the insurance company is now the legal owner. I agree with others - notify the insurance company. They may (or may not) make efforts to recover the property. If they do, you may be able to negotiate a sale from them. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, I guess it's like a car that gets written off...you can buy it back if you want to repair it yourself...
 
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