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Great video and great sounds, but... I would have liked to see that guy playing any other brand to compare against the VI's. My guess is that he will sound great on any instrument in that church.
 

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I just wish he would shut up and play.
 

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Very nice, although you can't really determine how much of that sound is actually the product of effects.
 

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How does one account for the sound of pre-war Selmers???
 

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Great video and great sounds, but... I would have liked to see that guy playing any other brand to compare against the VI's. My guess is that he will sound great on any instrument in that church.
Indeed...There's nothing that quite compares to the acoustics of a church like that. I had the privilege of playing in an empty cathedral in NY City once, with a friend playing the church's monstrous pipe organ. I'll never forget the sound. It was truly a heavenly experience. I was playing a Mark VI alto and it had NEVER sounded so good...(and never sounded quite that good again).
 

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How does one account for the sound of pre-war Selmers???
In my opinion and from what I know, the pre-war Selmers (Radio Improved, Super, Cigar Cutter........the "SSS" series) were slightly different bore size in both neck and body. Combine that with the different keywork layout and I think that can affect the sound slightly. Honestly, I don't think we'll ever truly know or be able to figure out without any doubt what makes the pre-war Selmer's blow and sound ever so slightly different than the later B/A's and Mk VI's. Something that should be taken into consideration too is the style and concept of the players those many years ago. Lastly, don't forget how much mouthpieces have also evolved since the early to mid 30's.

For what it's worth....
John
 

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Whoa really amazing! It must've took you numerous hours to produce this video!
 

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Indeed...There's nothing that quite compares to the acoustics of a church like that. I had the privilege of playing in an empty cathedral in NY City once, with a friend playing the church's monstrous pipe organ. I'll never forget the sound. It was truly a heavenly experience. I was playing a Mark VI alto and it had NEVER sounded so good...(and never sounded quite that good again).
I had a simular experience, except that the church was in Hoofddorp (Netherlands) and it wasn't empty when I started playing (but soon after that is was :bluewink:).

Years ago I couldn't play sax at home, but I could practice in a big shed on a farm closeby my house. It had in wintertime patatoes in it, but in summer it was empty and then it also sounded like in a church. Still remember that each time I started playing in that shed all kind of nasty animals (rats, mice) would try to find a save shelter...
 

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In my opinion and from what I know, the pre-war Selmers (Radio Improved, Super, Cigar Cutter........the "SSS" series) were slightly different bore size in both neck and body...
John, I was commenting with regard to the featured artist's emphasis on WWII spend shell theory - that the Selmer sound owes its very life to the composition of the brass. As a materials scientist, I am offended by the perpetuation of such a simplistic tale.

Selmers do indeed, as you have noted, get their core from their design. There are a great many pre-war Selmers with exquisite tone and no hint of war brass in their bodies - the kinder, gentler Selmers, I suppose.
 

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John, I was commenting with regard to the featured artist's emphasis on WWII spend shell theory - that the Selmer sound owes its very life to the composition of the brass. As a materials scientist, I am offended by the perpetuation of such a simplistic tale.

Selmers do indeed, as you have noted, get their core from their design. There are a great many pre-war Selmers with exquisite tone and no hint of war brass in their bodies - the kinder, gentler Selmers, I suppose.
Understood, Dr. G and I completely agree about the "spent shell" theory. Bah!

John
 

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I will always maintain that the "mystique" or "spirituality" of the sound of music comes more from the playing than from what it is played on, but that was indeed a wonderful video and wonderful sound. I enjoyed it immensely.
 

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What a load of out with the pixies BS.

The commentary and the Youtube comments make for a total intellectual feast [rolleyes]

Even if some Selmers were made from war casings or church bells or sunken ships or discarded moon landing equipment etc, it wouldn't matter anyway.

Musician tone delusional syndrome.

Guess what it sounded like?

Yes, it sounded like someone playing a sax and that's all and the room and acoustics can have an effect.
 

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How does one account for the sound of pre-war Selmers???
The original version that I heard of this myth was that the shell casings were from WWI, and that is how Selmer built their reputation for sound in the twenties. This whole church bell, WWII thing is a different tale.
Total b.s., but still a nice video to watch.
 

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The original version that I heard of this myth was that the shell casings were from WWI, and that is how Selmer built their reputation for sound in the twenties. This whole church bell, WWII thing is a different tale.
Total b.s., but still a nice video to watch.
The WWI tale is BS II.
 

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The original version that I heard of this myth was that the shell casings were from WWI, and that is how Selmer built their reputation for sound in the twenties. This whole church bell, WWII thing is a different tale.
Total b.s., but still a nice video to watch.
Thank you for saying it... It's all jive BS.
 
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