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Discussion Starter #1
My dad says that he played on one of these back in highschool and I could hardly find anything about it on the internet. A band director at my school also confirmed its existence. I was wondering if anyone in the forums could give any information that they have on this.
 

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The Mark VI and Mark VII are the only Selmer models with the "Mark" designation. Perhaps it was one of those horns.
 

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1. I think that your father's memory about 'Mark IV' is mistaken.
2. I doubt that you found ANYTHING on the internet about a 'Mark IV' Saxophone other than it is a frequent misspelling of 'Mark VI'.
3. I think that the band dirctor who confirmed the existence is also mistaken.

Browse to the Selmer Paris website and you can read all that they have to say about the Selmer Sax lineage...and there is no Mark IV...

(Edit) PS. Apparently I was posting at the same time as 'Barry' (Andy)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The thing about the balanced actions is probably it. The sax was an attic sax 40+ years ago when he bought it, which would put it in the late time period of the ba's. Although, is there any possibility of some kind of transitional horn? I'm pretty sure that he said there was a selmer logo on the octave key arm, but it was the double s. he said definitely not a 6 either. It didn't have the 6 keywork.
 

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I have a friend that claims there was a Selmer USA horn with that designation. I've never seen one nor heard of one from any other source but it was interesting to hear it from someone else.
 

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The thing about the balanced actions is probably it. The sax was an attic sax 40+ years ago when he bought it, which would put it in the late time period of the ba's. Although, is there any possibility of some kind of transitional horn? I'm pretty sure that he said there was a selmer logo on the octave key arm, but it was the double s. he said definitely not a 6 either. It didn't have the 6 keywork.
That "double-S" is actually supposed to be an "S" and a Co. Anyway, that makes it a #56k mk 6. Or Late #55k. I think that logo was only done in Elkhart and not on the Paris assembled horns, but I could be wrong.

The photo here is from my #56k MK VI tenor. It has "MARK VI" engraved near the left-hand thumb-rest/octave key. I believe that by #60k, they had switched to the more familiar "S" that is still in use today.

I have seen some transitional horns. Like a Super Action with MK6 spatula and octave key, but clearly a SBA tube. I've seen some horns of that vintage with a G# trill key in the right hand like some American built horns had.
 

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The thing when the VI popped out is that they had no inscription. Some of them were hand engraved Mark VI. Older selmers don't have names (except for Selmer Super Sax and Selmer Super Sax RADIO IMPROVED) Apparently they "discounted" a "couple of marks" back then :mrgreen: to refer to older horns, in what may be an attempt to still be hip :faceinpalm: "Ya'know I play on a Mark too, it's an older Mark" :bluewink:
 
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