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From the link, it appears to be about a C* opening with a round chamber so it may be similar to the old LT.
 

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Interesting - do you think it has been developed from the Concept ?
Yes, clearly. That's what Delangle was playing before this piece. I guess he wanted a bigger tip opening, among other things. The Selmer info refers to the "Concept family."

I'm still curious about the price. The basic Concept is priced at the top of the list for mass-market classical mouthpieces, and I imagine this model will cost more.
 

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Claude who?
I think he's the guy that taps his keys thinking a saxophone is somehow a percussion instrument. So I suppose I should inquire as to how his mouthpiece sounds when hit with a stick...
 

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This pioneering bi-material mouthpiece with its unique acoustic and sound properties testifies to Henri SELMER Paris’ ever-growing desire to improve it's products. Designed in close collaboration with Claude Delangle, this mouthpiece perfectly reflects his personality. A remarkable demonstration of our expertise, the Claude Delangle mouthpiece emphasizes the importance of creativity in the search for sonic perfection while continuing and reinforcing the long Henri SELMER Paris tradition. The metal ring characteristic of Adolphe Sax’s first mouthpieces and its cutaway design testify to a privileged relationship between tradition and the latest advances of the Concept family. The gold-plated metal ring lines the entire bore and allows for a denser, fuller sound with increased projection. The acoustic performance of this new alto saxophone mouthpiece signed «Claude Delangle» will charm saxophone players and audience members alike.

Claude Delangle is a French classical saxophonist. He has been teaching saxophone at the National Superior Conservatory of Music of Paris since 1988. He played in "Quatuor Adolphe Sax Paris" with Jacques Baguet, Bruno Totaro and Jean-Paul Fouchécourt. He was very implicated during the 1980s in developing the contemporary repertory of all the saxophone's family. His influences include Luciano Berio, Betsy Jolas and Japanese music. He studied Saxophone with Serge Bichon at the conservatory of Lyon and Daniel Deffayet in Paris.[1]
 

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"Claude who?"

"I think he's the guy that taps his keys thinking a saxophone is somehow a percussion instrument. So I suppose I should inquire as to how his mouthpiece sounds when hit with a stick..."
Hard words for a fine and well known classical player ....
 

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Hard words for a fine and well known classical player ....
I've seen him perform live at least a couple times now. I like the guy... but when he started to tap and click on his horn in the middle of a song... I'm sorry, I just burst out laughing. It was funny.
 

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I've seen him perform live at least a couple times now. I like the guy... but when he started to tap and click on his horn in the middle of a song... I'm sorry, I just burst out laughing. It was funny.
That kind of stuff is usually the composer's choice, not the performer's. Contemporary classical compositions make use of a number of "extended techniques," and sometimes percussion is called for. (I've seen a cool sax quartet performance with massive foot stomps.) This is not unique to saxophones, of course. Percussion is relatively common in classical guitar pieces, partly because of flamenco influence, I suppose. "Prepared piano" (sticking objects in the strings) is another example.

Slap tonguing is also a percussive saxophone technique. It's not "good tone" in the traditional sense, nor is it normal embouchure technique. But the effect is interesting, and adds powerful accents. Key percussion works the same way.
 

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Slap tonguing is also a percussive saxophone technique. It's not "good tone" in the traditional sense, nor is it normal embouchure technique. But the effect is interesting, and adds powerful accents. Key percussion works the same way.
No it doesn't. Slap tonguing involves actually playing the saxophone. Not clicking keys when your mouth ain't even on the horn.

I don't care if some composer wrote it that way, or the artist decides to click their keys in lieu of actually playing the horn... it's simply ridiculous in my view and I'll laugh out loud accordingly when I come across it.
 

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I would not exclude key clicks etc. per se. It can be a cool effect and I like it with flute playing a lot. It's all about the context. And if the composer wrote it like that, you don't have a choice in the classical world. Play it or don't play the piece at all.
But it can drive me nuts when player click on their keys in every playing break. Very distracting
 

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I remember seeing Professor Delangle perform live at a conference last October with this mouthpiece, or at least a prototype of it, he sounded fantastic (as expected). At the time, my friends and I were under the impression that it was just a custom Concept with a ring on the shank, but it's very interesting that the metal is in the chamber too. Knowing Selmer, it'll be pricy but I'm intrigued to try one.
 

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I remember seeing Professor Delangle perform live at a conference last October with this mouthpiece, or at least a prototype of it, he sounded fantastic (as expected). At the time, my friends and I were under the impression that it was just a custom Concept with a ring on the shank, but it's very interesting that the metal is in the chamber too. Knowing Selmer, it'll be pricy but I'm intrigued to try one.
Kessler's is now listing the Delangle mouthpiece at $324.75 (not yet in stock; full retail price supposedly $500). https://www.kesslerandsons.com/product/selmer-paris-claude-delangle-alto-sax-mouthpiece/. As I suspected, this piece has crossed the line from mass-market pricing into boutique classical alto mouthpiece pricing, at least in the United States. I'd bet that a portion of the price increase over the standard alto Concept's price is based on Selmer's assessment of what the market will bear, after the introduction of the Theo Wanne and Chedeville classical mouthpieces.

Claude Delangle is going to set a record for the most mouthpiece endorsements available simultaneously on YouTube. :) He's still up there the touting the Vandoren Optimum and then the original Concept.
 

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John Rodby wrote a concerto that Harvey Pittel recorded on a Crystal LP in the 1970s that incorporated key pops, so this isn't really a new technique.

Metal/rubber hybrid sax mouthpieces are as old as dirt. Was it Naujoks or something that made one... the name is no longer on the tip of my tongue.
 

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John Rodby wrote a concerto that Harvey Pittel recorded on a Crystal LP in the 1970s that incorporated key pops, so this isn't really a new technique.

Metal/rubber hybrid sax mouthpieces are as old as dirt. Was it Naujoks or something that made one... the name is no longer on the tip of my tongue.
Najouks-McGlaughlin or something like then. Henton too and others.
 

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I once attended a performance of a large Czech Moravian folk orchestra. While the violinists were great, two in particular stood out: a pair of young Roma boys. They could do everything the grown fiddlers could do -- frenetic, soulful bowing, rapid pizzicato -- but when the others rested their bows and counted measures, these boys quietly rubbed & tapped on the wooden bodies of their violins, producing an array of squeaks, sobs, & rhythmic accents that ably enhanced the ensemble's sound.

I've never forgotten what they taught me. Our instruments are tools, good ones capable of producing an astonishing array of sounds. Yet it's we, the players, who create the music -- by any means necessary. If the only instruments available to us were rocks & sticks, we could make fine music with rocks & sticks.
 
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