Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'll start -you add yours.

The Super Action 80 was designed to fit Fred Hemke's large hands.

Next?

[edit - fiction -see post 8]

[edit - Semer = Semler = Selmer when you are sleepy. You'd think I could get this right since I own a couple of Selmars.] :innocent02:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
7,867 Posts
Re: Semer Folklore - Fact, Fiction, or Just Fun

I'll start -you add yours.

The Super Action 80 was designed to fit Fred Hemke's large hands.

Next?
IIRC Hemke was involved with the design of the VII, not the SA80.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/MKVII fanatic/Forum Cont
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
let's clear up this Hemke & the VII thing right now.....

http://donmack.co.uk/SelmerSaxophones/FrederickHemke.htm (a review of the VII by Hemke where he names the actual designers)

well, the link doesn't seem to work anymore, it may have been removed being so old (or the server could be down), but the designers of the VII were Leon Selmer & a premier soloist alto sax player from the Guarde Republican Band in France...Michel Nouaux. Hemke, being a Selmer clinician, was consulted from time to time & gave his opinion & imput as did others, but was never "the designer of the VII" nor the Super Action 80.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,948 Posts
Leon Selmer & a premier soloist alto sax player from the Guarde Republican Band in France...Michel Nouaux.
So he should know a thing or two about shell casings then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
How about this one: the technician who assembled MK VIs stamped a code letter under the RH top F key. A, B, and C were the top three technicians.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
I was given this story by a chap called René Lavier, whose father worked for Selmers for thirty years as a production line assistant.

One of the senior testers on the line, Charles Duyelle, was said to have always been accompanied by his pet dog, a pure white Bichon Frise. It would sit under his bench all day.
Charles was one on of the many techs whose job it was to check the finished instrument, play-test and adjust it before handing it over to the packing department.
According to 'legend', the dog rarely made a sound...but once in a while it would start to whine along with Charles as he play-tested a horn. It was reckoned that these horns were the best of the bunch, and that they were the ones that the factory kept back to keep in their own showroom for visiting artists to try out and purchase.

It was once claimed that when Charles was taken ill for a few days, the dog came in on its own, found its way to its spot under Charles's bench and remained there all day until knocking-off time.

Rumor also has it that these horns became known by the staff as "Les Couelles de Chien".

Regards,
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
I was given this story by a chap called René Lavier, whose father worked for Selmers for thirty years as a production line assistant.

One of the senior testers on the line, Charles Duyelle, was said to have always been accompanied by his pet dog, a pure white Bichon Frise. It would sit under his bench all day.
Charles was one on of the many techs whose job it was to check the finished instrument, play-test and adjust it before handing it over to the packing department.
According to 'legend', the dog rarely made a sound...but once in a while it would start to whine along with Charles as he play-tested a horn. It was reckoned that these horns were the best of the bunch, and that they were the ones that the factory kept back to keep in their own showroom for visiting artists to try out and purchase.

It was once claimed that when Charles was taken ill for a few days, the dog came in on its own, found its way to its spot under Charles's bench and remained there all day until knocking-off time.

Rumor also has it that these horns became known by the staff as "Les Couelles de Chien".

Regards,
Fantastic! I sincerely hope that story is true!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
There was a story that, for a while, the guy who test played Selmers at the factory was playing them with a neck that was off spec in some way. Can't find this with search.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/MKVII fanatic/Forum Cont
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Blue Logo Necks - Why are some blue, others unpainted. (I seem to recall some with black paint - but unsure)

there was a short period in Elkhart when the assembled VI's had this dark navy blue paint around the neck S that did indeed appear to be black, but it was a very dark navy blue. my old VI alto had it & I bought it new back in 1964. it looked black except in a certain light & then you could make out the faint blue. my early VII alto has the same dark navy blue around the S.

Pete, I'm afraid you'll have to ask M. Nouaux about the shell casing thing & you'll probably have as much luck getting an answer from him (if he's still living) as you would from Jerome Selmer. there is a link to questions & answers about Selmers though....

http://www.answers.com/topic/the-selmer-company
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top