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Discussion Starter #1
I unexpectedly received a Selmer C# mouthpiece with a Conn NWII soprano that I bought recently. I posted some photos of it here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/iLMQGsChEZ6LExTi6

According to Theo Wanne's Mouthpiece Museum page on Selmer mouthpieces, it looks to me like it is a Selmer Short Shank Soloist. Should the soprano pieces have anything stamped on the table? Mine has nothing. What decade would this be from? I'm guessing the late 50's?

I was thinking about having the tip opened up some to open up the sound a bit, or maybe have a refacer check that everything is level and even. Would this be a good candidate for refacing, or would it be better to keep it original to preserve it's value?

Thanks.
 

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there is nothing on the table of these soprano mouthpieces (which are , strictly speaking, no soloist but made in the same era of the other sizes).

Don’t touch it and sell it as is.

I think I may have discovered a way to identify a Selmer soprano Soloist as opposed to an Air Flow.
Selmer soprano Soloists (and Air Flows) are not marked as such but have just the opening in an oval on the table. Today, I acquired a short shank (scroll) Selmer soprano mpc which has the opening (B) on the table in an oval. The seller claimed it was an Air Flow. As I have another similar mpc, (opening D) which I believe is a Soloist, I compared them and discovered three major differences.
The D is lengthwise while the B is across, the D has a (modern) small chamber while the B has a large chamber, and the scroll pattern of the D is a mirror image of the B such that the B pattern is like a chain of S'es. See the picture enclosed.
My theory is that the S-shaped scroll pattern is the oldest, used on the Air Flow pieces, and the other pattern is the younger, meaning that the D piece is a Soloist while the B-piece is an Air Flow.
I own several Soloists, short shank and long shank and Soloist style and all have the "new" pattern, except for my (only alto) SS Soloist piece which has the "old" S-shaped pattern. I therefore conclude that it is an early Soloist.
I also have one Air Flow tenor piece with a B in an oval (across) on the table and this one also has the "old" S-shaped pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks! No plans to sell it as I just tried it on my Conn and Yani and it sounds nice (which is kind of a problem as I was planning to sell the Yani).
 

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I unexpectedly received a Selmer C# mouthpiece with a Conn NWII soprano that I bought recently. I posted some photos of it here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/iLMQGsChEZ6LExTi6

According to Theo Wanne's Mouthpiece Museum page on Selmer mouthpieces, it looks to me like it is a Selmer Short Shank Soloist. Should the soprano pieces have anything stamped on the table? Mine has nothing. What decade would this be from? I'm guessing the late 50's?

I was thinking about having the tip opened up some to open up the sound a bit, or maybe have a refacer check that everything is level and even. Would this be a good candidate for refacing, or would it be better to keep it original to preserve it's value?

Thanks.
Some of them were stamped on the table and some of them were stamped on the body of the mouthpiece just above the barrel. Good luck with the piece, it's a nice one. Phil Barone
 

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... or maybe have a refacer check that everything is level and even.
You could also check to see if your teeth are straight and that your lips form an even seal on both ends. Or that your air stream is evenly disbursed through your oral cavity. Then of course the reed has to be straight, level and not warped in any manner. The ligature must be placed evenly on the mouthpiece holding the reed perfectly set within the middle of the opening with each screw set to the exact level of tension. Only then of course can we safely assume all is well.

But yeah... don't touch it. Sell it if it ain't for you. Also, don't forget that sometimes it's the imperfections that make a perfect match for us.
 

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You could also check to see if your teeth are straight and that your lips form an even seal on both ends. Or that your air stream is evenly disbursed through your oral cavity. Then of course the reed has to be straight, level and not warped in any manner. The ligature must be placed evenly on the mouthpiece holding the reed perfectly set within the middle of the opening with each screw set to the exact level of tension. Only then of course can we safely assume all is well.

But yeah... don't touch it. Sell it if it ain't for you. Also, don't forget that sometimes it's the imperfections that make a perfect match for us.
This is fantastic! Every sax player I know except Mike thinks that a mouthpiece has to be perfectly symmetrical to be a great piece. I've seen really asymmetrical mouthpieces that played dynamite and perfectly machined ones that were terrible, I know, I've made both. Reeds are so uneven that it doesn't matter if the mouthpiece is off, the whole saxophone is asymmetrical. Jesus, the myths continue to astound me, all because of the internet and neurosis. Can't anyone just judge a mouthpiece by the way it plays without playing it with their eyes? Phil Barone
 

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Can't anyone just judge a mouthpiece by the way it plays without playing it with their eyes? Phil Barone
Real players! You can't judge a mouthpiece's playability by looking any more then you can judge a reed's playability by looking. To paraphrase a conversation I had with Arnold Brillhardt "We used to go into the store, pick out the best looking reeds, put those back and buy the rest. I sometimes wonder if there are a lot of good reeds being discarded from the manufacturers because they look bad and might be fine players.

On the OP's post, I wish I had a vintage C* for soprano. Find the appropriate reed and enjoy it.
 
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