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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I ran across a Selmer Bundy II tenor in a pawnshop today. I play-tested it only as far as learning it has some leaky pads, but it does blow.

My question is, well, what exactly is a Selmer-Bundy II?

The s/n is 1081948. I've looked on a couple Buescher-Bundy s/n charts and there's no number that high.

Is this just a late model student horn?

Anyone know any good resources where I might find out more about this horn?

--Jonnie Boy
 

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Forum Contributor 2016-17
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I bought a Bundy II in 1986 which I still keep, serial # 953,xxx. I dont play it at all. Took it out of the closet and saw that there was a yellow card with some instructions dated 7/85. This one was made in Elkhart, In. Mine is definitely a student horn.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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A Selmer USA Bundy II is a horn based on a Buescher design. I read somewhere that the body tube is Buescher True Tone circa 1936 and earlier, although bell keys were moved to the right of the bell and the keywork itself (touch points) were meant to sort of mimic a Selmer Paris layout, without blatantly copying the Paris design that you see today on every new instrument.

They were definitely meant to be student horns, and as such, are quite rugged, fairly simple, and fairly easy to repair. A favorite marching band horn as a result. The fact that you pulled one out of a pawn shop still playable is a testimony to that.

Intonation is quite respectable, but sound is a bit on the brightish side. Set up correctly (few were) they play as well as any modern student horn and are easily much more rugged and less prone to needing repair and adjustment from less than delicate handling - when compared to today's Chinese-origin instruments. Bundy II's came out in the late '60s and production seems to have run into the mid to late '80s.

They were the grade school/intermediate school band saxophone of choice in their day, and there are a gazillion of them still out there, though few are still shiny -- with the possible exception of the "gold epoxy" finished horns (the "finish that can't be killed"). The Yamaha YAS-21 that came out in the mid-70's and the subsequent YAS-23 finally killed them off in the '80s.

They are very cheap to buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This confirms my suspicions. I'll be letting this one stay where it is in the pawnshop.

Thanks, guys.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Ya know, if you can pick one up in playing condition for less than $200, do it. That said, it doesn't take too much in repairs to quickly exceed the price you'll ever get for selling one in perfect condition.
 

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Ya know, if you can pick one up in playing condition for less than $200, do it. That said, it doesn't take too much in repairs to quickly exceed the price you'll ever get for selling one in perfect condition.
I have acquired several of these over the last few years and re-padded them, I have sold a couple of them to pro players who wanted a good solid backup horn. Both of those players told me that the Bundys are making a comeback because they are so dependable.

Ray Z
 
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