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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, here is my contribution, and a pretty big one (not a digital pic trick I swear):



http://mysite.verizon.net/vzerdi95/saxoinfo/

....and I would love to hear (actually see) what other Forum members come up with!

A note: those of you who have a "Selman" sax, sorry to disappoint but they are not Selmers with engraving mistakes -- just a genuine made in China instrument.
 

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I have seen lots of new selmers that use engraving to cover lacquer flaws. One Series II alto had a massive flower design just below the RH thumb hook. I just thought they added it for no reason, since it was lacquer. Upon closer inspection, you could see that the lacuer in that area was scratched pretty badly, and they were trying to cover it up.

Steve P
 

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I've certainly made my fair share of mistakes over the years. The worst was my super 20 silversonic alto a few years ago with a nude engraved on it. I got it perfect then started working on her face. Somehow she turned out UGLY AS SIN!!! She looked like a tranny, and not a Conn tranny either! I had to have her hair cover her face so no one could see the ghastly thing that dwelled beneath... luckily it turned out okay, but yikes! Engraving is incredibly difficult.

I remember when Bram flew me over to Holland to work on his collection and show him how to engrave. He handed me a mint condition 5 digit Mark VI, and what was the first thing my jet-lagged, exhausted self did with him staring over my shoulder? Slip. A nice big, fat scratch right across the bell. Our first lesson was how to cover up mistakes. I think he turned white as a sheet.

My first paid engraving job was mojo's Conn tenor, which was black painted with auto paint. I started engraving, and the paint started flaking off in chunks around the pattern! Yikes! I had to buy matching paint, fill in over the engraving, and then re-engrave it making sure the cut was consistent.

Oh! There was also the dreaded Oleg incident... he sent me a gold plated neck to engrave. I started to work on it, and my tool just slipped off and left a huge and nasty scratch. I figured I had just done something wrong and started to correct my mistake, again, it slipped off leaving ANOTHER nasty scratch. I called him up and asked what the deal was and he informed me the gold plating was over NICKEL! Now, nickel is nearly impossible to cut, and then with plating over it, there was no hope. So, I had to straight cut all the work on the neck, which can be done over nickel. It was the worst job I ever had to deal with.

Ahhh... luckily I never misspelled anything. Although I did kinda mess up the lettering on Ted Nash's tenor because the bell-bow band brass was uneven in consistency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
SAXISMYAXE said:
Not even a lisping German with a stammer could pronounce "Wtltklang". :D
I wonder what they were drinking in East Germany those days... maybe lacquer, that's why so many B&S manufactured horns are silver plated.
Anyway the funny thing about this horn is that my tech kept asking me "how to pronounce this?" while regulating the horn and... I hadn't even noticed the misspelling when I bought it (and I hadn't drunk anything).

Thx to Jason and Steve for their reports!
keep'em coming! pics?
 

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My first tenor was a satin silver 1924 Buescher True Tone. I got it in the late '70s for $75 (seventy-five dollars). It played well, if a bit clicky, and the sound was the real deal. But the finish on the keys was sort of bubbly (from overheating?), and some of the plating was pealing away and it was black underneath. Pretty creepy. And to make matters worse (or, if you think this way: to give the sax more character) there was a rather disconcerting engraving error.

Inside the crest on the bell of the sax were those familiar words:

The
Buescher
ELKHART
IND.

Fine. Except this sax had the middle line of the E in ELKHART go missing. Gone. Not smudged over. Never there. The E in ELKHART looked like a squared C, sort of like this:
[ LKHART

I mean, what the heck? Had the engraver been interrupted, have a momentary lapse and never looked back? And like, nobody at the factory looked at it after it left the engraver? Nobody?

So I began to think that the error of omission may not have been an error after all. I figured maybe it was an inner factory code, like for saxes that are seconds, a secret way of saying something like, "This sax is not yet finished and may never be."

That could explain the $75 (seventy-five dollars).
 

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A minor mistake on my horn.

They engraved the model number 303GD.

E.M. Winston assures me they NEVER made a GD model.
They thought I had misread either GP or GL until I sent them a picture.
 

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BobbyC said:
A minor mistake on my horn.

They engraved the model number 303GD.

E.M. Winston assures me they NEVER made a GD model.
They thought I had misread either GP or GL until I sent them a picture.
Well, I guess we know what "GD" stands for... the first thing the engraver said when he was done!
 

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Here's a good example of the "Naked Lady" on a Conn 6M. This one's on an original lacquer minty 1940 model.


This one's on a 1947. It looks like the engraver had a hangover.
Is that a misplaced breast on her arm? Bulging muscles?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
... or Dali.
Wondering if it was a lady at all.
(must have been a Monday morning)
 
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