Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 134 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,361 Posts
Year of manufacturer more like approximately 1922. No way such a horn is worth that kind of money (at least to sane buyers). DAVE
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013-
Joined
·
5,433 Posts
pearl dot G#

no front f

Why would anyone pay that much?

"This beautiful silver instrument is rare and coveted."

That is what is politely called "puffing."
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,374 Posts
WAY over-priced. But I wouldn't give you 35 cents for a C-melody horn (let alone $3k+), so who am I to say? But no one in their right mind will pay anywhere near what they are asking for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
WAY over-priced. But I wouldn't give you 35 cents for a C-melody horn (let alone $3k+), so who am I to say? But no one in their right mind will pay anywhere near what they are asking for it.
I have a c-mel and I love it and it was very cheap - I just don't have enough time to play it. But I agree, that price is beyond ridiculous.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
saxophone, flutes and lil' bit of clarinet
Joined
·
7,380 Posts
Seems they think it's solid silver.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Super Action 80 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 prototype, Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari, Fender J-Bass
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
There have been some young players doing some cool things with C-Melodys. I've been half tempted to grab one myself. Paying used Selmer Serie II prices for an old Buescher C-Melody isn't what I had in mind though. I'm tempted to ask the seller how he concluded that the sax was worth that much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
C-mels have appreciated faster than all others in the last couple years. But, just based on availability, intuition is correct: not worth 3500, short of some rare special case. Its getting harder to find good examples though to rebuild. I'm glad I found a good Buescher when I did.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,441 Posts
I think someone accidentally ingested some case candy. Not to mention I don’t see a neck! I sent him an email inquiring if the price was a typo. Let’s see :eek:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
34,047 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,441 Posts
“First year TT”1909 with a Dec,8,1914 patent date on it ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
"It craves a return to the Big Band Stage with you.

This sax enjoyed being played in several big bands in the 20s and 30s, then packed away during the war..."

Were C-melody horns ever scored into big band music? I've never seen a C-mel part, and I've played some pretty archaic charts.


I'd be surprised. A C soprano might sub for an oboe, but I'm not sure what a C-mel would emulate? Surely there were no original score parts for a c-mel?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Super Action 80 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 prototype, Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari, Fender J-Bass
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
No split bell sax is worth bothering with.
True Tones and New Wonders are great horns. Martins are interesting at the least. Everything else, meh...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,441 Posts
True Tones and New Wonders are great horns. Martins are interesting at the least. Everything else, meh...
So you wouldn’t have a Holton C Mel? My feelings are hurt.

Guess the seller vaporized. “ Listing has been deleted by author.” Will probably show up on flea bay.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013-
Joined
·
5,433 Posts
No split bell sax is worth bothering with.

My oblong G# and front F True Tone tenor is a really wonderful horn. The most automatically in tune and default legit timbre.

My Chu Berry tenor is an amazing horn. Not as in tune as the True Tone, but very free blowing and powerful.

Either of these horns would be worth a look for a serious player, depending on where they were going.

Both have some old fashioned ergos.

[I should mention that I do NOT thing that there is such a thing as a "jazz" horn or a "classical" horn. Such tendencies, in so far as they exist, are factors which can be brought out by a good player. A good sax in regulation, matched with an appropriate mouthpiece, should reach into any texture of sound required. The sax is an extremely flexible instrument by its very design.
 
1 - 20 of 134 Posts
Top