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All of the above and maybe try the Eastman 2.5 reeds or even a Legere, that'll dampen your edge quite a bit. And if that doesn't help, get a Yamaha 4C or 5C for $25 just for the band play.
 

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The whole "first chair"/challenges concept of school bands is antithetical to good section playing.

If I were a high school jazz band director, I'd put my best sax player on baritone, the next best on 3rd alto and 4th tenor. (Note that like the old fart I am, I insist on the old nomenclature, because it means something - there are 5 saxes, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 - etc., not enough space to expand on this here.) Why? Because baritone anchors the section and the interior parts are what makes it a section.

Of course if I did this the helicopter parents would be showing up with torches and pitchforks baying for my blood because little Johnny is "playing second" to someone who's not as good - why, he might not get that scholarship to Harvard!

Also, a good band director will throw solos to all the members of the section. Either break open a solo section, or swap parts around. IN professsional bands, that's done all the time - for example, if you're playing a stock chart and one of the alto parts has a wicked clarinet part - and it's the other guy who is the virtuoso clarinetist - why, they swap parts. The one who was playing lead, plays 3rd - and knows how to do it - and the one that was playing 3rd plays lead - and knows how to do it.

Unfortunately with all they have to cope with, most band directors I suspect are happy if something resembling the music emanates from the band at all.

+1 and thanks for sharing the link

Some other comments to the OP:

If you're playing 3rd and you're overpowering the section, you need to dial it back. Frankly if I were playing 3rd alto on a consistent basis I'd probably use my Selmer C* mouthpiece. I'm sure you have something similar.
Just what I told him in #5
 
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