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I am a thirteen year old saxophone player and my parents are in the process of buying me a new tenor saxophone. We have looked at many brands, and I am interested in a Cannonball big bell series. However, we noticed that it has a lot of scratch marks inside both of the necks which the dealer says are intentional by the manufacturer (for "acoustic purposes"). Because this sax costs a lot of money (at least to us) I am wondering if anyone out there is familiar with this brand and if these scratches are really intentional, or if the dealer is trying to unload this on us. By the way, we did look at two other Cannonball saxes at this dealership and they also had the scratches inside their necks as well.
 

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The necks are modified by cannonball. I have heard of similar stories of straches in the necks. I will have to peer inside my daughters big bell alto neck and report my findings!!!!
 

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Yes,inded there are scatches in both the lacquer and silver necks of my daughters Cannonball alto. They are near the where the tenon is attached to the neck.
 

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It would be great if someone would take a couple of photos of this, I'd love to see what Cannonball are up to...
 

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Shhhhh! Cannonball calls those "trade secrets."
 

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steve goodson has been threading necks in his shop for players for years, including Mark VI necks . it's no secret. threading the inside of the neck is supposed to increase air speed making altissimo easier and a richer tone overall.
 

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saxxsymbol said:
steve goodson has been threading necks in his shop for players for years, including Mark VI necks . it's no secret. threading the inside of the neck is supposed to increase air speed making altissimo easier and a richer tone overall.
So, I guess that makes it a "well-known trade secret." :D

Whoa! that made 500 for me!
 

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It's not about 'air speed'. There is no high-speed air in a sax, not even at the mouthpiece tip. It's about acoustics. Rough interiors of mouthpieces and necks seem to make them play better. It is therefore the act of a misinformed person to polish the insides of mouthpieces, necks and saxes. Selmer Paris is now using the neck tenon 'threading'. Dave Guardala always left a certain pattern of file marks on the roof of his mouthpieces. Dukoff mouthpieces always have the sand finish of the casting on the roof and other inside areas. Now Cannonball is 'scratching' the interior of the neck? Good for them - they're beginning to get it. All talk of 'air flow' and 'air stream' inside a saxophone is ridiculous. Inside a car engine cylinder head? Sure. But not in a sax. The air volume is too low and the instrument bore is too big, even without the reed acting as a flap valve, slowing down the air as it closes the tip opening thousands of times a second. It's the 'column of air' that supports the tones - air speed has nothing to do with it.
 
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