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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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No worse than pop singers who use the auto-tune. As long as you look like a model, we can make you sound "good."

We are not far from going into the studio and singing a bunch of syllables, or articulating a bunch of notes and having an engineer/ producer turn them into "music."

I guess I have to hit the gym, because I am surely not a model!
 

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Why upset? It's a tool. That is all. Musicians were scared when midi came out.
Tool for what? To mask your inability to play music? I'm fine with not learning theory, but you have to put in some effort notwithstanding. People that don't know theory but have a passion for music generally use their ears, not programs that change their wrong notes into "right notes" and change the dynamic levels and the current octave at random.
 

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An electric guitar playing friend of mine once said he thought synthesizers weren't real instruments because they needed electricity to perform.......um, kinda like ELECTRIC guitars and basses-- especially without amps? (Sure, you can hear one up close without power, but I digress...) I agree if it alters or distorts sound for an effect can be cool, but to hide or correct bad singing or playing is IMO a rip-off. So many acts today are based only on looks because tools today can make anyone sing or play in tune. Gaga, Bieber, Brittany, Ashley Simpson............ugh!
 

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Just a little aside: Henrik Schwarz is a great artist and has probably done more for the popular recognition of Jazz, Soul and Funk, particularly in combination with electronica, than most famous instrumentalists I could name right now. He might not be a real musician, but who knows what will develop out of this invention that gives non-musicians the possibility to create sounds without the view (and blindness!)of a real musician.
He might be a DJ, but I have a strong feeling that DJs tend to have a better feeling for TASTE in music than most real musicians.
Giving them the ability to play (if on a quite basic level), should be considered an enrichment to music, not a threat.
 

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I'm waiting for the Schwarzophone and Schwarzinet, so I can wiggle my fingers anywhere I want to with complete abandon and sound like Mike Brecker or Mulligan or maybe Eddie Daniels. Who needs all that practice stuff.
 

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I'm waiting for the Schwarzophone and Schwarzinet, so I can wiggle my fingers anywhere I want to with complete abandon and sound like Mike Brecker or Mulligan or maybe Eddie Daniels. Who needs all that practice stuff.
I guess neither practice nor the Schwarzophone will take you there... unless you are a real Brecker/...-head, in which case i apologize
 

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Just a little aside: Henrik Schwarz is a great artist and has probably done more for the popular recognition of Jazz, Soul and Funk, particularly in combination with electronica, than most famous instrumentalists I could name right now. He might not be a real musician, but who knows what will develop out of this invention that gives non-musicians the possibility to create sounds without the view (and blindness!)of a real musician.
He might be a DJ, but I have a strong feeling that DJs tend to have a better feeling for TASTE in music than most real musicians.
Giving them the ability to play (if on a quite basic level), should be considered an enrichment to music, not a threat.
Why not spend five minutes on the internet looking up a diagram of the piano, and learning to play a basic C major scale? Then spend another minute learning how to play a C major chord. Not exactly complicated. I bet in just 30 minutes you can learn to play some basic melodies. Now, in just about 40 minutes you have already: learned to play 7 notes, if you were paying attention also learned their names; learned to play one chord; and learned some basic melodies (let's say Ol' McDonald or Jingle Bells).

By using that program you press keys at random not worrying about hitting a wrong one because it automatically plays the right one for you (like a bicycle that can't fall over). It probably doesn't always yield a good result. In the video he hit an E I think and it gravitated towards C, instead of F or G or whatever. What if you wanted to go up and you didn't know what note to hit? I just think that the only thing that can result from this is stagnation. If you never fail, you never learn.
 

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Forum Contributor 2008/Distinguished SOTW Member
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This is production music. It is music produced purely through science and technology (redundant, I know). It's just the way things seem to be going and kicking at it and screaming at it does no good. The only way to fight it is for those who still take their development seriously - keep perservering.

Machines have replaced labor in so many areas of our lives - why wouldn't it try to replace musicians. Hopefully this is a trend and fascination that will temper (these things never seem to go away).

Watching the video is quite hilarious and frightening. My understanding of music was to play what you hear instead of hearing what you play.

This is what they are doing.

Poor guy can learn programming and twitter on his lap top but it's just too hard for him to learn anything about music. Wah.

Sorry, this guy is a freakin baby.
 

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Just a little aside: Henrik Schwarz is a great artist and has probably done more for the popular recognition of Jazz, Soul and Funk, particularly in combination with electronica, than most famous instrumentalists I could name right now. He might not be a real musician, but who knows what will develop out of this invention that gives non-musicians the possibility to create sounds without the view (and blindness!)of a real musician.
He might be a DJ, but I have a strong feeling that DJs tend to have a better feeling for TASTE in music than most real musicians.
Giving them the ability to play (if on a quite basic level), should be considered an enrichment to music, not a threat.
Never heard of him until now. He must be a heavyweight.
 

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I don't have a problem with it, in the end making music is not the ability to play one particular instrument but the ability to create music, so the proof of the pudding is in the eating and composing is what you do with it not the tool that you use to do it.


If you use something like this and you can create you have limitless possibilities to express yourself.

Me? I find it already difficult to play my instruments as they are but why should I limit someone else?

A composer is great not because of his ability to play but the ability to think the music that someone or something plays.
 

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I don't have a problem with it, in the end making music is not the ability to play one particular instrument but the ability to create music, so the proof of the pudding is in the eating and composing is what you do with it not the tool that you use to do it.

If you use something like this and you can create you have limitless possibilities to express yourself.

Me? I find it already difficult to play my instruments as they are but why should I limit someone else?

A composer is great not because of his ability to play but the ability to think the music that someone or something plays.
This program isn't practical though. Say you want to play solely in C major but you hit an F#. What note do you hear? F or G? What if F sounds and you wanted G? The program cannot read your mind. The "spread" and "dynamic" options are complete jokes too. Spreading your chords across a bunch of octaves and it selecting what octave your note is in for you, and then selecting the dynamic levels for you as well. As a method of musical expression, it is completely worthless. Its only use is for people that don't want to put in any effort to push a bunch of keys and hear sounds.
 

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I don't have a problem with it, in the end making music is not the ability to play one particular instrument but the ability to create music, so the proof of the pudding is in the eating and composing is what you do with it not the tool that you use to do it.

If you use something like this and you can create you have limitless possibilities to express yourself.

Me? I find it already difficult to play my instruments as they are but why should I limit someone else?

A composer is great not because of his ability to play but the ability to think the music that someone or something plays.
You talk about creating and expressing. But these have nothing to do with his process. The program creates and expresses. This has the same amount of personal expression as the arppegiator on my casio keybord. Or turning on a jukebox.

DJ's tend to be a little too sefl congratulating IMO. As if their hearing a song or a piece of a song somehow meant they composed it.

I am so sorry that learning a musical instrument is too hard for these people. Maybe they should just stay home and watch tv.
 

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Never heard of him until now. He must be a heavyweight.
That's possibly because he's not a musicians' musician.

Anyhow, he's probably not THAT much of a heavyweight, but he is well recognized and the music he likes as a DJ is instrumental to a large extent.

Ever wondered how many people have never heard of, say, Joe Lovano, Chris Potter, Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis...?
Well, these guys ARE "heavyweights", but do they really reach a lot of people, do they manage to move them? Do they have any broader (pop)cultural relevance.......kinda rhetorical....

Well...I understand most of the points mentioned here, but I don't get what all the emotion is about. This guy is not a musician, but he would kick most of our asses when it comes to other things, those in which he is an expert. If you really think this little instrument is going to be a threat or if you think "those guys should learn a real instrument", then you simply don't get them...let them have their fun and don't be so judgmental about some guy inventing a mediocre tool to have some fun and maybe create some nice sounds. He might even create extremely nice songs with this thing, mind you good music doesn't have to include coltrane changes, 16th runs or any other display of technical virtuosity.
 

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I feel you are perhaps missing the point. Technology is not the problem, it's the individual being excluded entirely from the equation. There is no input at all from the user. If it were a device that can read your mind and reproduce melodies you *think* of instantaneously, then there would be no problem. Now that would be something else. Instead the user is tasked only with pressing a button, any button, and the computer sees to everything else. It doesn't even seem to operate in any musical manner either.

He might even create extremely nice songs with this thing, mind you good music doesn't have to include coltrane changes, 16th runs or any other display of technical virtuosity.
Who said it did? Good music generally requires only human emotions and sincerity to be good (it's not as simple as that, and sometimes that's completely false, but it can be boiled down to that). There really are no emotions with a device like this. No one's getting emotional in this thread, at least I don't think so, we're all just expressing our opinions like the TC asked us to.
 
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