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· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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I think these saxophones aren´t from germany, and they are from Holland, and NO are stensils of Keiwerth. Years ago I tested one of them and it was not so good for me.
You are right and wrong. Shenkelaars...like D & J...did their own keywork on bodies made by Keilwerth. So the body came from Germany, and assembly of keywork/mechanisms was done in Holland.

This is why many people look at the horns and think them to be Julius Keilwerth !

;)
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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I have an example of a Schenklaars made in-house in the For Sale section as well, just for comparison sake if anyone is interested.

I'd note that despite the shaky reputation, this is a good horn, really.

The other one however was quite a decent one. big sound and technically allright functioning.
So they seem to vary quite a lot.
Yes, well this is one of those, then.
Build is good, precision of keywork and posts and all is good, ergos are as fine as any other vintage horn, and she sounds quite nice.
 

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· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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20,389 Posts
Thanks, and just to clarify....most Schenklaars I have seen are stamped "Holland". Which is why I asked.

So, that is another "indication other than the engraved name", actually. ;)

Although, honestly, I have never come across a Schenklaars engraved "Schenklaars". Just stencil named ones....
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Yes, one can see by the keywork (round G# touch, only 2 side keys) this is not so much a 'player' as an interesting historical piece. Looks to be in fine shape and is certainly usable as a sax (provided not high pitch) but the keywork is leaning towards archaic.

Just curious why this query is posted in a thread about Schenklaars, though....?
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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I don't claim it's really a player, but if you look closely you can see 3 side keys (the E is longer than usual and it's easy to miss it).
Yes indeed that helps. Assuming it has a bis key and rollers on the spats and table, then I suppose it wouldn't be as archaic as I had initially thought. It does, after all, have same-side bell keys. Sorta like playing a Holton Rudy Weidoft, or an early Buescher TT or the like, then.
 

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Yes, I dunno what sorta 'deal' this is. I mean....one can occasionally find a Schenklaars Tenor on eBay in project condition for around $200...complete, all parts there...no holes to patch or fill.

$395 ??? That's only $50 or so LESS than what one in decent playing condition goes for....

I WILL say THIS, after having refurbed a few: they aren't BAD horns at all. They really aren't. They have that JK tone, they aren't terribly built, they are pretty solid, and the Schenklaars keywork is no worse than most other European stencils of the era which employed traditional keywork (Malerne, Orsi, Weltklang, Alfonse Rampone, etc....).

They are fairly common and often times fail to sell or sell for very low prices.

Here they have no market at all and only lately a few buyers resellers specialized in the low end market have taken to buy them for less than €100 if at all.

In view of this, the asking price is simply ridiculous.
Absolutely..... if one has a $400 for a project Tenor - that EASILY gets you a 16M, King Cleve, Holton Collegiate, Olds/Pierret Parisian, late model 'Crat, D&J, Kohlert, Santoni-made Evette, or even a Martin Indiana (to name a few)....all better choices.....
 
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