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Hi guys... me (the guy from brazil) with another stupid and dummy again...LOL

I started to study theory... from the basics... I got a copy of The Jazz Theory Workbook(a very good book for beginners BTW) and something is not making any sense for me.

I will try to explain maybe you can help me to understand that...

Lets assume a basic progression Cmaj7 G7 the book says that on maj7 chords i can play the Ionian mode (so that will be C D E F G A B C) and on dominant chords I can use mixolidian mode (that will be G A B C D E F G)

I think this is a little bit funny because it is the same notes... so whats the difference? (besides the starting point) looking for that I just dont know why I cant just think in using the C major scale for the two chords? am I missing something?

Thx in advance
Maybe you are missing something . . . . . I would urge you to improvise/practice intervallically and not using a chord scale relationship to start with. This will give you a stronger and harmonically clearer foundation for playing the changes. Think of the chords all the way up to their 13th (Thats 7 notes). As a starting exercise pick a tune, and play through the changes using the respective arpeggios up to the 7th degree. Not only will you hear the changes, you should also be able to hear the melody against the chords. Build on this.
 

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Yes the two modes hage the same nots but they have different sonorities. It is important to learn to hear the differencees between the different modes. A good exercise that I like is to practice the modes individually playing all of the mixolydian modes around the circle of fourths. Another startegy is to play the modes starting starting on the same note. For example: play C ionian and when you get back to where you started switch to dorian, and the phrygian ect.

Also, it helps to pick a mode an improvise on that mode and try to emphasize that mode and make the sound of that particular mode come through. Do this playing free ideas and in time.
 

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My understanding is, originally chords are coming from scales and not scales coming from chord. That is why maj and min chords have different chord scales. Imaj7 and IVmaj7 have different chord scales. Same goes for II-7, VI-7, III-7 chords. If you look it at this way it might be easy to understand it. So it is really a matter of the key you are in at the moment. But the theory have been expanded and there is a way of thinking it the other way around ( dorian over VI-7, lydian over Imaj7, alt scale over V7 etc,). Some books and teachers teach it like scales are coming from the chord which sometimes makes it confusing.

So like others saying, you really want to know the sound of the 12notes on any chord. Some notes will sound stable and some will sound dissonance in different degrees. But this takes quite a time so I recomend to practice to become able to hear 12 notes over any chord on daily bases. And on playing situation you might want to use the ear more which will lead your melody to a natural direction.

Practice on one chord a time is very good thing to do for your ears and technique. Improvise with the chord tones, then with the chord scale, then the chromatic scale over the first chord then the second chord and so on. After each chord, loop two chords and practice it the same way, first chord and the second chord, second chord and third chord and so on.

Hope this helps.
 

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Hi Pete,

Great material...and the best... for free LOL I almost regret to have buyed the book LOL... you material seems to be much more complete than the book I buyed... I'll try to think about chords(as you and JL suggests)... aproach tones and to put some scale note here and there to give a diferent feel... another thing I thinking is to use some patterns and licks for the IIm-V-I progressions... but Im curious about something Steve said... the guide tones approach... where can I find more information about that?

Again guys ...thx ...
 

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.. the guide tones approach... where can I find more information about that?
.
In a nutshell, guide tones are generally the 3rds and 7ths of each chord (those tones usually sound the quality of the chord best). So for example in a ii-V7-I progression in C (Dm G7 C), the guidetones for Dm would be F and C, for G7 they'd be B and F, and for C they'd be E and B. It's a good idea to combine guide tone movement with good voice leading (another term to look up) to smooth out the line. That essentially means moving from one chord to the next with as small a step as possible. In this case two possible guide tone lines with smooth voice leading would be:

Dm G7 Cmaj7:

F F E or C B B

Play those single notes in your right hand on the piano against the chords in your left hand and you'll find out how it works. Don't have a keyboard? Go get one!
 

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Hi Pete,

Great material...and the best... for free LOL I almost regret to have buyed the book LOL... you material seems to be much more complete than the book I buyed...
No no no !!!!!

The book is purely the fingering stuff and there is more in the book, plus all the tone studies that aren't on the site.

Also when you buy the book, you have a book, and the knowledge that you just helped some talented kids with disabilities to get a lot of confidence as musicians.
 
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