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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am abit confused with which scales people say should memorise my heart. I know there are many different version of scales out there ie. diatonic fourth, arpeggio, triads etc but the problem is that each author of the material make out their own versions of what to practice so essentially they are all different apart from how they sound and the structure of the notes in the scale. So are the definate scales out there they people use. please list them so I can work through them. The problem is I just work through them without actually absorbing each scales.

Cheers

From Michael
 

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Thanks for the Tim Price link, Dr. G. I'm sending it to my eager 1st. yr. college student. Think I'll make a copy for myself.
Starboarder: Advice about major and minor scales is GOOD. Memorize 'em all, from 1st degree, (tonic) or 12345678, and where possible, two octaves, then learn to play "In the key", ie. be able to start on any note of the scale you're working on and play the proper notes. This really makes your brain work with your ears. Then try the blues scale in the same fashion. Likewise, chromatic. Good luck! Let us know how it goes.
 

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I am abit confused with which scales people say should memorise my heart. I know there are many different version of scales out there ie. diatonic fourth,
What is a diatonic fourth? Whatever it is I would learn the basic scales first: major, minor and a couple of modes. I think blues scales are also very useful early on.

arpeggio, triads etc
these are not really scales. An arpeggio is alternate notes of a scale, a triad is a chord. All worth learning.
 

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I know there are many different version of scales out there ie. diatonic fourth, arpeggio, triads etc
I think you are talking about different patterns to play on a given scale. I'd suggest first learning a scale from the 1st degree stepwise up the octave and back down, as sandy said above. Once you've done that, you can start working on various patterns. You're making it too complicated. I'll repeat what I've said over and over on here, first learn the 12 major scales. There are only 12 of them. Learn them well. Then it will be relatively easy to learn every other type of scale (minor scales, blues scale, pentatonic, etc) since they can all be derived in one way or another from the major scale.

Don't confuse chord arpeggios, etc, with the actual scales.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
JL you hit the nail in the head, yes there are simplt too many patterns to play on a given scale, I guess that is to be expected but still makes it confusing for a beginner.

I learnt the cycle of 5th before , now JL please tell me where i can find the 12 major scales (please tell me they are all played the same, and not vary with different pattern) that you refer to, name of a book perhapes. I think that makes alot of sense now.

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I learnt the cycle of 5th before , now JL please tell me where i can find the 12 major scales (please tell me they are all played the same, and not vary with different pattern) that you refer to, name of a book perhapes. I think that makes alot of sense now.
You can find them in just about every basic music book. But what the heck. Here you go:

The 'formula' for a major scale, starting on the first degree, is (W=Whole Step, H=Half Step):

W, W, H, W, W, W, H

C D E F G A B C
C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#
D E F# G A B C# D
Eb F G Ab Bb C D Eb
E F# G# A B C# D# E
F G A Bb C D E F
F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#
G A B C D E F# G
Ab Bb C Db Eb F A Ab
A B C# D E F# G# A
Bb C D Eb F G A Bb
B C# D# E F# G# A# B

You'll want to get the scales written out as music (notes on the staff), though, at first. But, you don't know them until you can play them from memory, by ear. They all sound the same in relative terms.

A couple of those sharps are weird, because they are enharmonic. B# is C, E# is F. I won't try to explain the reason for that, beyond the fact that a scale is spelled out in consecutive letter names. A piano keyboard can help a lot!
 
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