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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard a couple rumors and wanted feedback before I look any further. I was told that pre SC991/992 sopranos had spotty tuning compared to these. I was also told that the key layout on them are not as good, expecially with the left hand pinky cluster. How do you all think they compare? I have seen the older 800 and 900 models going online for anywhere from $1100 - $1500. I never see the SC991/992 up for sale used, and the prices on the new ones are going up. Any truth to the rumors and are they any good?
 

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bradshawm said:
I was told that pre SC991/992 sopranos had spotty tuning compared to these.
Not true. The SC901/902 is identical to the SC991/992 save the curvier neck and revised left-hand pinky table which puts the bell tone holes on the other--now normal--side of the horn.

bradshawm said:
I was also told that the key layout on them are not as good, expecially with the left hand pinky cluster.
It was the "old style" left-hand pinky table. The table was "modernized" with the tilting Bb.

bradshawm said:
How do you all think they compare?
The sound is identical.

bradshawm said:
I never see the SC991/992 up for sale used, and the prices on the new ones are going up.
Heh, because the SC991/992 sopranos are THAT GOOD. :)
 

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I've played both . . . SC991 and SC902 - I own an SC902 and had an SC901 at the same time (since sold).

I agree with SaxyAcoustician. Both models (newer and older) play great - superb scales. I'm one to like the newest and the best (even with my propensity to like vintage too) and there just wasn't any playing differences between the SC991 I tried and my SC902, especially to justify the cost.

Yes, the left pinky tables are different (the SC991/2 being a more modern design to go with the bell pads switching to the right) but that is nothing, really.

If you are set on a curved sop, have no fears with the Yanagisawas, either the new designs or the previous design. If you want the best Yanagisawa soprano out there (in MY opinion) buy an S901. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wasn't it just the straight models that were based on the Mark VI, or were there curvies based on it also? If so, do you know which models or what years?

Out of curiosity, after they stopped basing it on the Mark VI, did they base it on something else, or design their own?
 

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Yanagisawa's MKVI-clone was known as the S-6 and was also issued with the VITO name. Some rave about the S-6 and Vitos. The one's I've played were okay but not the rave that others experienced.

Yanagisawa also issued some "Martin" branded curved sops but I don't know what other brand served as a model for those, if Yana modeled them after anything.

As I understand it, Yanagisawa then issued the more modern-keywork designs (the ones with the bell pads suspended from above as opposed to below like MKVI's and almost all of the vintage sops, if not all) and if they copied another design, which they could have, I'm not familiar with those details.

The SC901/2 models appear to me to be merely their straight S901/2 with a curve in it and with a different left pinky table more along the lines of previous generation sops (NOT the tilting design of the most modern sops).

All of this is only mildly interesting to me (useless trivia, really). My bottom line is that ever since Yanagisawa went to the modern bell-pad designs, their sopranos, both curved and straight are terrific. Who they copied, if they did, doesn't matter to me. Almost every soprano made today looks the same.

If I had to guess, I'd guess that Selmer led the way with their SA80 sopranos after the MKVI ended. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Dave. You are always a wealth of knowledge on these things.

I only ask because I have found several SC800 and SC900 out in the used market, but never SC901/902 . Just not sure what the differences are between the models and since I really can't play them without ordering one it would be nice to know that before hand.

Have a great Thanksgiving all.

Marshall
 

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Marshall: You are welcome.

About those lower-numbered models, I'm GUESSING they are merely earlier versions of the SC901/2 series just like the S800 and S900 straight models (I recall there was an S800, but I could be wrong) are earlier versions of the current dual-neck model (S991/2).

The "2100" you mentioned rang a bell with me - I'd forgotten about that designation until just now when I read your last post. I bought a new Yanagisawa straight soprano in the late 1980's - it had two necks and was marked "Elimona". I recall it was a 2100.

If my memory is correct, then a CS2100 is most likely a curved sop from that era. Maybe someone more familiar with Yanagisawa's history can weigh in. DAVE
 

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More info,
I have become somewhat of a yani curved sop guy. I have owned 4 now. I owned 2 curved Vito stenciled yani's. A SC-991 and currently a SC-901. The stenciled Vito's are definately SC-900's not 901's. There are a couple of very subtle differences. The stenciled horns have ribbed construction on upper and lower stacks, but some of the other keys are post to body, where the non stenciled badged yani's have all ribbed construction. The SC-880's don't have front F keys and some even retain the inline left palm keys like the mark VI horns and the S-6. The 901's have a lot less bend in their necks. The 880's had more curve in the necks than the 901's. The new 991's went back to a more radical curve, which I do like better. The 901 I play now plays as well as the 991 did. As a buyer, you must ask yourself, is the extra $1000.00 for the 991 worth it? If you like the more modern pinky cluster and right hand bell keys, they are worth it. If you don't care, save the 1k, and buy a 901 because they are monster horns. The stenciled vito's and Martins are very good horns too. The vito/martin horns tend to play a bit brighter because of it has slightly less ribbing. One other difference between the stencils and yani badged horns is that the neck on the stencils have a standard neck octave instead of the underslung neck of the non stenciled horn. No matter which yani curvie you buy, you will be buying a horn that will sound great and you will never outgrow it. They hold regulation very well and retain their value like the yamahas and selmers and the other real pro horns. If you buy a yani, your tech will thank you and you will play in tune. Yani's rule,
 
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