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Hi All

I love coming to these pages as I have learned so much about different horns, how good or how bad they are, and their market value. I've been offered a SBA Soprano, serial number 40XXX range and wanted to know, what they are going for in original silver plate, with 98% of the plate remaining, just over haul about two years ago, as a even trade for my MK VI 84XXX Tenor I have posted here on our forum also for sale. The person who wishes to trade is willing to pay for the shipping of both horns, the soprano to me, and the tenor to him.

This is a very important decision for me, because I have the matching set 114XXX MK VI's in silver plate and just thought this would be a plus to add to me stable, but... I want to make sure that the SBA Sopranos in the serial number range mentioned are good horns, and then again, I won't till it arrives here and I play test it. So, I'm open to any suggestions, as I was also thinking of getting a MK VI soprano in the more stabled intonation range, because as I have read, some MK VI sopranos are difficult to keep their intonation while playing them. Your thoughts and comments will be greatly appreciated...

Philo
AKA FrenchMKVI
 

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Any vintage horn (seller or other) can be highly variable even with adjacent SNs. No way Personally I would make the trade without playing the soprano first. I haven’t played a SBA soprano in a very long time but from what I remember the ergonomics were odd. I’ll also add for me I prefer vintage alto and tenors but modern sopranos.
 

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Thanks... This helps, but this is a rare soprano, not many made in the serial number range, but I'm also interested as to how ell they play and the market value of the horn and I see no one is interested in the post, or possibly can't help out, but I'll wait to see if there is a worth tech or play that can enlighten me about the soprano... Philo
 

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Vintage SBA sopranos have a great sound and feel almost identical to MK VI sopranos ergonomically. Market value is about $6k - $7.5k on them as they are more rare. IF you found an American engraved one, which I haven't seen and don't know if they exist, it'd be worth $10k+ in really good condition.

I haven't seen your 84k tenor, is it original ? If so, this trade is not equal in market value. If it's relacquered then it is probably more equal pricewise although the SBA soprano is always the tougher sell.
 

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Thanks so much TM for the very informative comment. My 84XXX tenor is an early factory re-lacquer. It's the darker lacquer that we don't find on recently lacquered horns, but a phenomenal players horn. There are so many opinions as to when the horn was re-lacquered or the truth concerning the engraving, and if the MK VI was originally non-engraved and the engraved after the re lacquering was done. All I know is that the horn plays top to bottom beautifully, and seriously thinking of taking the horn off the market and keeping her, but... being on a fixed income and my matched 114XXX silver plated set out for repairs, I in need to pay for the repairs on the alto and the full restoration of the tenor. I'm not being left with much of a choice. I'll see how things move along in the next couple of weeks, because I do also need to purchase a baritone sax as well. Thanks again and much appreciate your help.

Philo




Vintage SBA sopranos have a great sound and feel almost identical to MK VI sopranos ergonomically. Market value is about $6k - $7.5k on them as they are more rare. IF you found an American engraved one, which I haven't seen and don't know if they exist, it'd be worth $10k+ in really good condition.

I haven't seen your 84k tenor, is it original ? If so, this trade is not equal in market value. If it's relacquered then it is probably more equal pricewise although the SBA soprano is always the tougher sell.
 

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Thanks... This helps, but this is a rare soprano, not many made in the serial number range, but I'm also interested as to how ell they play and the market value of the horn and I see no one is interested in the post, or possibly can't help out, but I'll wait to see if there is a worth tech or play that can enlighten me about the soprano... Philo
Buying it as a collectors horn is a somewhat different scenario. Then it doesn't matter as much how it plays if it is rare and mint. From what I remember when I was in the Pro circles 20 years ago they had a reputation for being horribly out of tune and I honestly can't remember one person I ran across playing a SBA soprano.
 

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There are a few SBA sopranos for sale at the moment, varying in price.
Well, now we know what they don't sell for...

Seriously though, rare sopranos are a tough sell. Eventually, a seller might get his price, but it'll take months if not a year or more. I know this from personal experience. So if someone is offering such a horn in trade, you pretty much have a superior bargaining position. Use it in your favor.
 
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