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Huh, well I'll be... I've never seen one of those and never would have guessed such a thing existed. Interesting!
 

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Only because I'm curious as I can't afford this in any fashion. Why would there be two different serial numbers on the horn?
 

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Only because I'm curious as I can't afford this in any fashion. Why would there be two different serial numbers on the horn?
Maybe the bell was replaced somewhere along the way? I don't buy the seller's hypothesis that it could have been a factory mismatch.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I’ve ping’d Douglas Pipher to check into the books regarding this horn. He may be able to reveal its story.
 

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Nice. When I went to the eBay site following the provided link, I saw another auction for a MKVI soprano, five-digit 89xxx. What amazed me was that it looks almost exactly like my five-digit MKVI soprano (81xxx) down to the engraving AND the added engraved "MARK VI" with a registered trade-mark circle-R under the right thumb hook.

Mine was gifted to me. The one in the auction had a buy-it-now of something like $13,500.

I am shocked. DAVE
 

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Only because I'm curious as I can't afford this in any fashion. Why would there be two different serial numbers on the horn?
Maybe they just used old parts to make one? I know that Buescher and Conn would keep old parts for more uncommon pitches of sax, so I would imagine Selmer might also. (as an example, I've seen pictures of a Sopranino with serial 190xxx with a 1950s Buescher aristocrat engraving.)
Regardless, that's a pretty rare horn, and rather interesting...
 

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I’ve ping’d Douglas Pipher to check into the books regarding this horn. He may be able to reveal its story.
Mark Overton wrote some info on it in the Selmer (Paris) Saxophones group on Facebook.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Serial numbers on body and bell...left hand bell keys. Not SBA-like. Will be curious to hear from Doug Pipher.
 

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MDWade: Given that curved Selmer sopranos are rare, what is there about left-hand bell keys that strikes you as unusual ("not SBA-like"). What would be SBA-like on such a saxophone? Just curious. DAVE
 

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I also have a Mark VI era Selmer curved soprano (#57074) from 1955 (silver plated). After significant restoration, including the relocation of the thumb rest (!) it is a wonderful instrument, though no where near the sonic quality of my Selmer Straight #90xxx and #101xxx (silver), much to my surprise.
Paul Cohen
 

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What makes this a SBA? The MKVI sopranos and baris continued during the MKVII run for alto/tenor but that doesn't make the former MKVIIs. Was there ever a SBA soprano or just sopranos made during the time while SBA altos/tenors were produced?

No trying to argue that any of the above makes this anything but a beautiful instrument, which might merit the asking price. I simply don't know. However, possibly the "SBA" designation has little merit.

Here’s a thread about a similar horn from a few years ago that belongs to Paquito D’Rivera

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...prano-1952-53&highlight=Selmer+curved+soprano
Great read - thanks!
 

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Just because it was produced during the SBA-era doesn’t make it an SBA. If it was a one-off, does it need to be classified...especially when it appears to be so unique?

Are the lower stack keys rotated 15 degrees?
 

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Selmer Paris produced small batches of Curved Sopranos (usually 6 at a time) from the early 1920s to the early 1950s. Total production is at least 70 examples. I have photos of 19 of them. The last two batches (51k and 57k) are keyed to high F and all the earlier batches are keyed to high Eb. It appears that only one example has the optional trill keys. (Eb and G#)

This particular example has the body from 51557 and the bell from 38885. I am of the opinion that this is how the instrument was originally assembled. (at least one other example also has two serial numbers.) All the Curved Sopranos have the left-hand bell keys and none of them appear to have offset lower stack toneholes. But, the keywork on the later examples is definitely of SBA design. (for example, the adjustable G/G# connector bar.)

With all that said, I consider the 31k and 38k examples to be Balanced Action and the 51k and 57k examples to be Super-Action (SBA)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Just to complete this thread for future research:

Quoting Mark Overtone on FB: "This is cool! Here are the log book entries for this instrument. Apparently, it was made at the time of the balanced action and finished at the time of the SBA. Selmer's logbook entry for #38880-5 is blank except for a silver curved soprano written in at #38881 dated 1950. Then the books show a small run of curved sopranos from #51556-61 dated 1953. Probably the same instruments."

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