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Jolle said:
...the most boring way of dissecting music and the hated recorder are one of the main reaons a lot of kids stop with making music (only to regret it afterwards).

greetzz
Another is having to march to be in any band at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
NICE THREAD!!!!:protest:
 

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saintsday said:
Another is having to march to be in any band at all.
The bane of my existence for eight years. The only, ONLY, ONLY reason I stuck with marching band was to play in jazz band and wind ensemble in high school, and to get a sizable scholarship in college.

But, I made my band director's life just as much a living hell as he did mine! :twisted: I'm sure he was uber happy to have me finally graduate.
 

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Mr. Hartman at Urbandale High School and Mr. Lake at Edina High School were excellent and perhaps more importantly patient band instructors. They seemed to like their jobs and working with kids. My hat is off to the both of you. :cool:
 

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I forgot to mention a few who wer NOT my band directors but influenced me greatly. First, Tom Bishop who was the director of the Lake Wales FL band; I was in HS in 1963 visiting my family and went to a summer concert he had. It was a small town with a well known band (said so on the city limit signs) and after the concert the band gave him a new car. The guy was like a King in the town. This made me go into music education in college (later wised up and went into copyright law). Second, the students I taught in college who are now band directors. Third and most important, my father who although an Army Col. had played clarinet and sax in the 20s and offered me the support to become a musician. He still looks at the stuff I get on ebay even at 92.
 

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My high school band director, hm... well, he helped me out with a job or two, got me a couple gigs, gave me a quarter of his record collection, gave me a call when he found someone trying to sell their Mark VI tenor, and well... best of all, back in fifth grade, although my first choice was baritone (that noisy thing with the valves), he decided to put me on the alto saxophone instead. He offered me a beer once, too.

For a guy who still can't read chord changes, he's not half bad.
 

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I wouldn't be here on SOTW w/o my HS Band director. I was a choir kid, and wanted to join the band my junior year to see what it was all about. I approached him, said I wanted to join, and asked what instruments he needed. He replied "I could really use a tenor saxophone." I then asked, "Okay - what does that look like??" :D

He really helped me along in the beginning and then as I got more advanced, helped me out with my college audition pieces, etc.

Then, he helped me get into college by hooking me up w/ Dr. David Wright, one of his good buddies from college at SUNY Fredonia.

The coolest thing he's done however is put together an alumni band concert every year. I go back to my hometown every June to get together with old friends and play some great music. Then we'll all go out for some drinks, catch up, and remember good times in HS together.

Definitely one of the most influential teachers I've ever had & a good friend too.
 

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HS band director? Well, remembering the advice of my mom, I'll not say anything at all...

Actually, this isn't completely true--I did have a good one for a couple of months. Ironically, the music teachers I found inspiring all bailed out of music and did something else with their lives. That probably has a lot to do with my choice to *not* major in music in college later on.
 

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My first High School band director was also coincidentally my old Clarinet teacher from the age of 10. He was a WW II veteran and once a professional musician playing Sax and Clarinet. A few years after the war he quit playing for a living and settled down and became a music teacher.

Unfortunately, I was a child of the 60's - 70's and he was a very 'conservative' and intolerant guy.

I could not get along with him at all once I entered High School. He retired my Sophomore year. He was thoroughly disliked by practically everyone in the band. If I were to meet him at this point in my life, I could probably get along with him just fine...but that was then...this is now.

The next two band directors only lasted one year each...the first was a Tuba player...the second a Trumpet player. I got along with both of them well enough as they were younger and more 'hip' than the old band director. They were both OSU grads.

In college I had the good fortune that one of the band directors was a professional Sax player (Alto and Soprano) and a really great guy. I was good friends with him throughout college and even afterwards, though he has moved all over the country over the last 25 years and we have since lost touch with one another.

One last thing about the 'old' band director who retired...

When he broke up his private music studio to move away to a new home he put many of his horns up for sale. He contacted me to see if I was interested in buying any. I went to his house to look and wound up buying a Hungarian Taragato from him for 20 bucks, but passed on a pearled King Zephyr Special Alto Sax because I couldn't afford the $ 100 he was asking. I can't remember the details of any of the other things he had for sale.

My Alto at that time was an old silver plated 1920's Martin (still have it) and the Zephyr would have been a nice step up horn for me. I wish I had bought it.
 

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Of course then there was the elementary school music teacher that I organized a bean shooter attack on...
 

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Mr. Paul Miner from CWJefferys Secondary in Toronto, wherever you are, thanks. In hindsight, this was one very cool, dedicated, hard-working man (although it's hard to recognize this when you are a student in the moment). Taught orchestra, "stage" band, and jazz combo to me grades 10-13 (yup, 13 grades at the time in Canada... it was the 80s). Had the right blend of encouragement, teaching skills, and was hard on us when we needed it. And, the cat could PLAY the trombone! He'd often sit in with us (in practice or even in public performances) on trombone or the rhodes electric piano when we were doing jazz combo, he'd never show off, but lay down something that we would all rise to... He took us across the country to Vancouver for the Expo in '86 for performances, he had us compete very successfully in '87... he even cut an album with the school band in '85 when there were a few tier-1 players (I was not one of them)... For graduation he had the class over to his house for a Barbeque... one seriously generous fellow.

One event that I remember like it was yesterday was when I was a senior and slated to perform with the Jazz combo for a school assembly... I was to report to the music room for setup 20 min before the assembly. The class I was in at the time (Creative Writing I think) had a pr|ck of a teacher (can't remember his name), and when I asked to leave at the appropriate time, he denied me. I protested, and he literally grabbed me by the arm and dragged me to the principal's office to have a seat. As I'm sitting there with the a$$hat teacher glaring at me, the music teacher comes in to request on the PA for me to report to the music room as I am MIA. I explain the situation to him, and he says "just a sec", both teachers go into a closed office and I hear the muffled sounds of music teacher raising holy h3ll on my behalf at the other teacher. I can't begin to describe how difficult it was to not show the extent of my smugness when they walked out... I just looked away and followed Mr. Miner to the music room and set up for the assembly. But man, did he ever win my loyalty that day (like he needed it!).

Again, Paul Miner, wherever you are, thanks sir!!!!

Pete
 

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jazzbluescat said:
I usta like to wet the end of a straw wrapper and shoot/stick it to the ceiling.:)
Or the wet end of a paper match. If you were really going for it, you'd glue pins onto flat toothpicks and make darts.
 

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Carl H. said:
CHILDREN !!
I'm so sorry, Dad. I'll never do it again. Ever...



Can I have the keys to the car?
 

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Paul Tweed. Ran all the bands like a professional organisation. Man, we rehearsed. And we rehearsed. Then we rehearsed some more. Then he threw your butt onstage. Had him for 6 years, '62 to '68. I remember working the New York World's Fair in '64 and '65. Anybody remember that bandshell they had on the fairgrounds back up behind some exhibit? I got out of marching cause I played football, but we had concert band, a production variety show called jazzarama, a musical show, like Guys and Dolls, or Bye Bye Birdie, pep band, and jazz band. Lots of gigs. Thanks, Mr Tweed.
 
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