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I recently picked up a Saxscape Downtown .105 prototype. It plays well with a Rigotti 2.5 strong but I'm curious about the baffle. I'm primarily an alto player and have not played too many high baffle pieces. This almost looks like a second step baffle going into the chamber. Other step baffles I've seen usually angle directly into the chamber. Have any of you seen this type of baffle before? Is this modeled after any particular piece or maybe something Ken was working on with the Downtown? thanks for your help
Jeff
 

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You could ask Ken himself about the design. I was curious about the design of my Downtown Studio and emailed him, he was quite helpful and friendly.
 

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The two flat baffle ramps look a lot like the baffle design you see on a lot of Dukoffs. However, it then drops into a not-quite bullet chamber, similar, but not identical to a Berg.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Upon a bit more research it seems to be a “power chamber”. I think other models have this as well.
 

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For what it's worth, Ken did base the Downtown's sound profile on a Dukoff. The standard power chamber (ie small chamber) gives it pretty impressive volume, which makes it great when you have to cut through a band. But it can be a little harsh and one-dimensional, and it's certainly not everyone's cup of tea.
A little while back, Ken made some prototype Downtowns with medium and large chambers. He was calibrating his new equipment so he played around a little bit with the basic DT. I was fortunate to be able to snag two of the medium chamber pieces at the time and really liked how the larger chamber mellowed out the piece a bit.
A few weeks ago I hit the jackpot when the large chamber .107 prototype came up for sale.
What makes this piece so special is that the original owner modified it a little bit as he found it "a little, ummmm, harsh on the eardrums" so he rounded over the first "break" and smoothed the transition into the chamber like so:
DT large chamber 1.jpg DT large chamber 2.jpg DT large chamber 3.jpg

That work plus the large chamber makes this particular piece a really sweet player and very versatile. It retains everything good about the basic Downtown design with none of the harshness imparted by the original baffle profile. As I told Ken, it still has plenty of baffle to make loud when pushed. But it's really sweet and has a rich tone that's a touch on the dark side, particularly at lower volumes. Plus, I found that just a little bit of air makes it smooth and very easy to control until you need to step on the gas and make it roar.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After communicating with Ken, I decided to take out that second step baffle and continue the first drop right into the chamber. There was certainly plenty of material to work with. The piece is much more playable for me now, still plenty bright but much easier to control and a bit more versatile as well. here is a before and after pic. The second picture was hard to capture but it's an even slope from the baffle right into the chamber. The second pic is obviously the original piece.
 

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What Ted did with mine was to simply smooth out the transition from the baffle into the already enlarged chamber, like what Greg Wier did with a Rousseau JDX I have, thus mellowing out the harshness caused by the (I'm theorizing here) abrupt transition of the high speed air over the baffles into the small chamber. Your mod basically forgoes that transition and simply keeps the initial baffle as is, but opens up the chamber significantly. I might try that on one of my extras, and at the same time adjust the shape of the baffle so its more of a crescent.
One thing I like about Ken is that he's not afraid to make little changes to his pieces, hence the prototypes. Here's a more recent Downtown .100 prototype on which he used used a new ball end drill on the chamber.
You'll notice it's much rounder and extends farther, right up to the beginning of the second break. Although technically not a "medium chamber" piece, it effectively opens up the chamber a bit and enhances the playability somewhat. Same design, just new tooling and, in my opinion, a change for the better (at least as far as my playing is concerned.) YMMV.
 

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I recently picked up a Saxscape Downtown .105 prototype. It plays well with a Rigotti 2.5 strong but I'm curious about the baffle. I'm primarily an alto player and have not played too many high baffle pieces. This almost looks like a second step baffle going into the chamber. Other step baffles I've seen usually angle directly into the chamber. Have any of you seen this type of baffle before? Is this modeled after any particular piece or maybe something Ken was working on with the Downtown? thanks for your help
Jeff
Hi this is the main Downtown style I was making from about 2014-18, mostly in HR profile. It's based on a Dukoff baffle design from a gold-plated silverite Dukoff I borrowed from Danny Walsh which used to belong to Mintzer, I believe. It has a pretty small chamber but the geometry works out for good intonation. It's probably the brightest design I've made. Thanks! Ken
 

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For what it's worth, Ken did base the Downtown's sound profile on a Dukoff. The standard power chamber (ie small chamber) gives it pretty impressive volume, which makes it great when you have to cut through a band. But it can be a little harsh and one-dimensional, and it's certainly not everyone's cup of tea.
A little while back, Ken made some prototype Downtowns with medium and large chambers. He was calibrating his new equipment so he played around a little bit with the basic DT. I was fortunate to be able to snag two of the medium chamber pieces at the time and really liked how the larger chamber mellowed out the piece a bit.
A few weeks ago I hit the jackpot when the large chamber .107 prototype came up for sale.
What makes this piece so special is that the original owner modified it a little bit as he found it "a little, ummmm, harsh on the eardrums" so he rounded over the first "break" and smoothed the transition into the chamber like so:
View attachment 235228 View attachment 235230 View attachment 235232

That work plus the large chamber makes this particular piece a really sweet player and very versatile. It retains everything good about the basic Downtown design with none of the harshness imparted by the original baffle profile. As I told Ken, it still has plenty of baffle to make loud when pushed. But it's really sweet and has a rich tone that's a touch on the dark side, particularly at lower volumes. Plus, I found that just a little bit of air makes it smooth and very easy to control until you need to step on the gas and make it roar.
Hello Scott! I'm thrilled you are enjoying that mpc so much! I still have several and only one left up on eBay it's a 102 Downtown as well that's pristine. I have a FatCat, Slant, and 3 Hudson's. My Chateau S90 copper horn will move a small truck with a DT or Live piece on it, so just not practical. I played in front of 350 for hors d'oeuvres this weekend and I didn't use a mic. and was easily heard without any edge The Chateau and Slant played nicely and now that I understand Ken's sound concept(took a while) I'm very happy with it. I get compliments all the time about the tone. I'm super thrilled this piece got back to you. Best regards!
 
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