Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
A lot of players prefer this look. In fact, most all high end manufacturers offer models that mimic the no lacquer look. I own nine saxes & the lacquer has never been a factor in my buying or selling.

The question of "potential dangers"? I have no clue....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
Higher maintenance in the long run when you need to clean it to get rid of the verdigris and other oxidation products that are potentially poisonous. In addition, this can develop pits that over a few decades could turn into holes :evil:

On the upside, if there are a few tiny dents, they are hard to spot. Personally, I don't like this look, it reminds me of the fake Stevie Ray Vaughn Stratocasters with their artificial ageing but beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But, no real risks that could influence the quality of the instrument in the short run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,724 Posts
No "danger".

You might get some green verdigris or red corrosion that can come off on your hands.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,566 Posts
I like the partial lacquer look too, more than a totally de-lacquered horn.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
As far a danger I've never heard of anyone getting any kind of harmful reaction from playing a un-lacquered horn. I prefer a horn with full lacquer, for the look as well as overall protection for the instrument.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
·
18,172 Posts
No "danger".

You might get some green verdigris or red corrosion that can come off on your hands.
Right. There are horns with 30-40% lacq which are clean, and horns with 40% lacq which are terribly red-rotted/verdgris-ed.

Personally, I don't like my fingers touching keys of red rot or verdgris....makes 'em smell bad afterward.

I cannot speak to whether this is physically dangerous.

So generally, I suggest to folks, if buying a horn like this, they invest in a chem or sonic bath ...if the seller hasn't already previously done so somewhat recently.
 

·
Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
·
3,807 Posts
You’re in danger of having an instantly more awesome sounding and feeling instrument the minute the rest of that lacquer comes off because we all know unlacquered instruments are better...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,703 Posts
that's a sign of a horn that has been played. you are in danger of having found a great playing horn! if it was a lemon, it'd probably been shinning in a collectors closet.
my primary Mark VI looks just like that, plus a few more damages along the way in its long life. it is the best all-around tenor I own, and I have a quite a few to say the least.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
39,138 Posts
well, of course some people seek unlaquered horns and this one is pretty much on its way there, it may have been helped there by some steel wool application and there may be more lacquered spots elsewhere. If you like it you like it and if you don’t you don’t.

Some horns degrade and show signs of zinc loss or green oxidation but others never do that, this appears to be nicely aged. It will probably stay nice and if you wipe it after playing and maybe add a little bit of wax onto the wiping cloth it ill protect it from most of the agents which may cause only superficial decay.

The worn-out look appeared to take a foot-hold first in the ’80 when artists started sporting a “ casual” look while until the ’70 all artis maintained a formal look to their horns which were often relacquered ( there used to be shops specialized into this) it was made famous by artists such as Michael Brecker.

Later on people started imitating this look even on new horns although there hasn’t been anything like the “ relic” guitar subculture where one produces, in purpose, scratches and scuffs to pretend a “ use” the instrument never has had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,703 Posts
Later on people started imitating this look even on new horns although there hasn’t been anything like the “ relic” guitar subculture where one produces, in purpose, scratches and scuffs to pretend a “ use” the instrument never has had.
That's true, no scratches or scuffs, but to me the equivalent to that trend on saxophones is the "vintage" lacquer finish so many brands offer today. Kind of started with Selmer Ref 54 in the 90's if memory serves me right.

View attachment 265734
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,111 Posts
I say get rid of the lacquer and just polish the gd thing now and then.
Some people use car wax, which seems to ward off tarnish for a good long time.
There is a beauty to well kept old brass that's handled with love on the regular.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,508 Posts
...
The worn-out look appeared to take a foot-hold first in the ’80 when artists started sporting a “ casual” look...

Later on people started imitating this look even on new horns although there hasn’t been anything like the “ relic” guitar subculture where one produces, in purpose, scratches and scuffs to pretend a “ use” the instrument never has had.
I have seen that with some cameras as well - so the buyer can appear to be a lifetime photojournalist and combat photographer.

When and where will this fad end? If we are not careful, soon there will be a new style of clothing with rips, cuts, and artificial marks of soiling...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
I have seen that with some cameras as well - so the buyer can appear to be a lifetime photojournalist and combat photographer.

When and where will this fad end? If we are not careful, soon there will be a new style of clothing with rips, cuts, and artificial marks of soiling...
Where have you lived for the last 15 years? Asking for a friend :)
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top