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Hi everyone! I'm a new member to the SOTW forums and I was wanting to see if anyone could answer my questions. I'm a musician in high school right now and I am ready to buy my first sax. There's a Cannonball hotspur tenor I've been looking at and the owner says it plays perfectly, there's just a lot of stuff needing to be cleaned. From the looks of it, the exterior bell is pretty spotted with green stuff in lots of places and on the keys and rods. There's quite a bit of it. I can't see the inside of the sax from the pictures but it looks like there's probably green stuff in there as well. It's not an old hotspur either, it's a recent Stone Series model. Is there a way to take this off, and how much would it cost? Will it corrode the sax? Is the sax worth the effort and money? Thank you in advance! View attachment 222756 View attachment 222758
 

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Did the owner say how it got the way it is? Left outside, or put away without swabbing? If the keys and rods are corroded, it's a good bet the pads are too - which means that it will likely need some repair work too. You don't say how much the owner wants, and you don't provide a link to the pictures, so we can't really judge, but having said that...

If you can't play it before buying, then I'd pass. You can probably find a good horn locally, that you can go test (or have someone who plays well, if you are a beginner, test it for you). If you have to buy online, then buy from a reputable dealer instead of an individual on E-Bay or Craigs List.
 

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Hey Skeller! I updated the post with photos so you can see. The sax isn't looking too hot, y'know? I just wanted to see if it's still worth it. The owner says he's used it in gigs and such and it plays really well; I don't wanna take his word 100% though. His ad doesn't say how it got the way it did, he just said it needs cleaning (probably an understatement).
 

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A sax that is used a lot will get this way - it needs a cleaning and oiling. if you're going to use saxophones you need to learn how to do this for yourself. And there's no way to tell if its 'worth it' without knowing the $. I would guess maybe $500 if it has no dents and plays well.
 

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A sax that is used a lot will get this way - it needs a cleaning and oiling. if you're going to use saxophones you need to learn how to do this for yourself. And there's no way to tell if its 'worth it' without knowing the $. I would guess maybe $500 if it has no dents and plays well.
Hey there 1saxman! It's priced at ~$1,800
 

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Plenty of used Taiwan saxes you can get in like-new shape for that money.
 

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I've concluded I'd rather not get this saxophone. Thank you to both of you for helping out with my questions. I'll look for other saxophones from reputable sellers rather than taking a gamble with an individual seller. Thanks :)
 

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Thing is, for an essentially brand new horn to have that degree of verdigris corrosion through the plating implies something environmental. Whatever has attacked the brass clear through the plating has probably also attacked the steel rods/screws/springs, and may well have attacked the pads too.

My 75 year old silver plated baritone sax, with all the plating worn off at all the touch points and the pearls worn down visibly though decades of playing, does not have that degree of green corrosion penetrating the plating.
 

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That's expensive for buying sight-unseen, a highly corroded sax. It could well have spent time in sea water.
I would not buy it unless you have the mechanical details checked thoroughly by an independent technician. Likewise any so-called "vintage" sax. They can be an enormous can of worms, especially on Ebay.
Buy a Yamaha student model or 62 model Yamaha, new or second hand. Or a Yanagisawa.
 

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I've concluded I'd rather not get this saxophone. Thank you to both of you for helping out with my questions. I'll look for other saxophones from reputable sellers rather than taking a gamble with an individual seller. Thanks :)
As an example, there's a nice Barone tenor for sale on this site for just over $1300 that is probably the best deal here right now.
 

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Did the owner say how it got the way it is? Left outside, or put away without swabbing? If the keys and rods are corroded, it's a good bet the pads are too - which means that it will likely need some repair work too.
If you can't play it before buying, then I'd pass. You can probably find a good horn locally, that you can go test (or have someone who plays well, if you are a beginner, test it for you). If you have to buy online, then buy from a reputable dealer instead of an individual on E-Bay or Craigs List.
+1

Mason.....that horn may well play...but it has not been kept well...and I give the seller benefit of doubt when he says it is playable.

It is verdgris and in the case of a plated instrument, the usual way it gets that way is by being stored/kept/left in an environment of high humidity, as well as possibly always being put in its case wet with no wiping, swabbing as Skeller says.

If there's as much verdgris as it appears, there's a fair bet that there's some icky stuff on the pads as well, which you cannot see. In the very least, the horn requires a full disassembly and the body and neck a chem bath/sonic bath followed by a soap-water cleaning. Then a tech, if deciding pads are OK, would have to hand-clean the keys (since one cannot dunk padded keys into a bath).

So, minimum, you are looking at $200 of tech work (again this assuming the pads are still good and the regulation is OK and there are no significant leaks anywhere).

I am a refruber/repairer...I would hold back a good $300-350 minimum from whatever the seller's asking price is for this horn. Because you will need that &
$ to clean it up and adjust it...
 

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Buy a Yamaha student model or 62 model Yamaha, new or second hand. Or a Yanagisawa.
YES.

Come on now, folks....$1800 can get you way better than a used contemporary Taiwanese middle-model Tenor these days.

Easily buys you a Yama 61, actually. Or a Yani T5, T6 or 880 even.....

Mason, if you have $1800 to spend, you can get a used, highly-reputed, professional-calibre horn, in good playing shape, no problem.
 

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Come on now, folks....$1800 can get you way better than a used contemporary Taiwanese Tenor these days.

Easily buys you a Yama 61, actually. Or a Yani T5, T6 or 880 even.....

Mason, if you have $1800 to spend, you can get a used, highly-reputed, professional-calibre horn, in good playing shape, no problem.
This ^
 

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YES.

Come on now, folks....$1800 can get you way better than a used contemporary Taiwanese middle-model Tenor these days.

Easily buys you a Yama 61, actually. Or a Yani T5, T6 or 880 even.....

Mason, if you have $1800 to spend, you can get a used, highly-reputed, professional-calibre horn, in good playing shape, no problem.
+2. Or maybe, +2000...
 

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I've noticed that for some reason, lately, people are trying to flip Cannonball's for pro Yamaha money.
 

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I don't think that is just 'recently', actually...I have always noticed folks overpricing their used C'balls....and sometimes, getting what they asked. Always baffles me a bit....
 
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