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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is not a paid advertisement it is just a self endorsement of a product I would recommend to any serious saxophone players.

I already know I am probably going to get some hate comments but for anyone who has the time and money I highly recommend a product sold by Meridian winds, the saxophone resonance weights. As of right now I know they only sell them for alto sax, not sure if it would fit tenor, bari, etc..

I have been using this product for about 3-4 months and at first I put on my sax, and didn't really think much of it. A few months later I decided to take it off and play a few scales and songs. My first thought when taking this off after months of using it my saxophone sounded like it didn't resonate very well and the sound was not as rich as I usually perceive it to be. I do not know the science behind it but I do know it does have some sort of affect on the way you perceive your sound weather or not it is a placebo affect.

These weights were made for both Selmer and Yamaha saxophone, and they come in different sizes, shapes and finishes. The one I use that I personally think has the most affect on my sound is the 5 oz. solid German silver weight. The way it work is you connect it to the brace of your saxophone, which helps hold the actual tube and bell of the saxophone and it supposedly makes your sound more rich and resonant. It does come with an option to engrave the weight but I thought that would be a waste of money. If you are interested in trying out the weight from Meridian Winds I will leave a link down below.

Notable saxophone players that use this are Otis Murphy, Timothy McAllister, Donald Sinta, and Joe Lulloff.

Thanks for reading this and I hope you take some time to look into this and try it out yourself. :)


https://www.meridianwinds.com/product-category/woodwinds/saxophone-woodwinds/center-brace-resonance-weights/
 

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This is not a paid advertisement it is just a self endorsement of a product I would recommend to any serious saxophone players.

I already know I am probably going to get some hate comments but for anyone who has the time and money I highly recommend a product sold by Meridian winds, the saxophone resonance weights. As of right now I know they only sell them for alto sax, not sure if it would fit tenor, bari, etc..

I have been using this product for about 3-4 months and at first I put on my sax, and didn't really think much of it. A few months later I decided to take it off and play a few scales and songs. My first thought when taking this off after months of using it my saxophone sounded like it didn't resonate very well and the sound was not as rich as I usually perceive it to be. I do not know the science behind it but I do know it does have some sort of affect on the way you perceive your sound weather or not it is a placebo affect.

These weights were made for both Selmer and Yamaha saxophone, and they come in different sizes, shapes and finishes. The one I use that I personally think has the most affect on my sound is the 5 oz. solid German silver weight. The way it work is you connect it to the brace of your saxophone, which helps hold the actual tube and bell of the saxophone and it supposedly makes your sound more rich and resonant. It does come with an option to engrave the weight but I thought that would be a waste of money. If you are interested in trying out the weight from Meridian Winds I will leave a link down below.

Notable saxophone players that use this are Otis Murphy, Timothy McAllister, Donald Sinta, and Joe Lulloff.

Thanks for reading this and I hope you take some time to look into this and try it out yourself. :)


https://www.meridianwinds.com/product-category/woodwinds/saxophone-woodwinds/center-brace-resonance-weights/
Are they as good as changing the lyre screw? Phil Barone
 

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I do not know the science behind it but I do know it does have some sort of affect on the way you perceive your sound weather or not it is a placebo affect.
When you have a reasonable theory as to the possible science behind it, that will probably help me decide "weather" I want to try it or not.

It does come with an option to engrave the weight but I thought that would be a waste of money.
Oh, sure -- engraving it would just be a waste of money. It would be stupid to waste money on that.
 

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Where's the list of notable players?
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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These weights and stones - just imagine how great the 'Greats' would have been with them. Tell you what, after 60 years of gigging, I do not want to do anything that makes my horns heavier - my neck hurts now after a job. And my back. And my feet. I could make it easier on myself by not playing baritone and dual saxes but I'm not ready to let any part of my schtick go. I also hate harnesses, so I take what I get. Fortunately (I guess) I'm only working once or twice a month so I guess that's for the best. But while I haven't tried any of this stuff and consequently have no grounds to claim it doesn't work, I can assure you I will not be finding out.
 

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There’s no hate in calling B.S. - but not a whole lotta love either.
 

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I can see there are two camps here on this weighty issue concerning meridian winds:
The ante-meridians and the post-meridians.

This morning I started out on one side, but by afternoon was on the other.
 

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c'mon, for only $100, that's a bargain!

I'm surprised they don't offer a version made from recycled shell casings. I can't believe Selmer used all stock up on Mark VI's :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Says it right after the explanation;

Notable saxophone players that use this are Otis Murphy, Timothy McAllister, Donald Sinta, and Joe Lulloff.
 

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I can see there are two camps here on this weighty issue concerning meridian winds:
The anti-meridians and the post-meridians.

This morning I started out on one side, but by afternoon was on the other.
I know they do good overhauls-they overhauled my Bass clarinet that I bought from them, which I very much like.
While I like the shop, I still think this (and that heavy screw) is basically snake oil.
 

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DanielO.

Try to follow my reasoning here. There is absolutely nothing in the last hundred years of acoustic research that would support adding mass or weight to the outside of a saxophone having any effect upon the sound waves in the column of air inside the instrument which produce and disburse the sound to the listener. The vibrations of the walls of the saxophone may feel different with the added weight, but no "coupling" takes place between the wall vibrations and the vibrations in the column of air inside the instrument. In order to find a "coupling" acoustic researchers could actually measure the "tube" had to be made extremely thin .2 mm and it had to be slightly oval shaped---traits not found in musical instruments we use.

I don't discount the fact that you have the "perception" that the saxophone has more resonance with the added weight, as do the notable players mentioned on the Meridian Winds Website. My hypothesis is that when this or any device gives a player the impression or perception that there is an increase in the energy of the sound ie more "resonance" that the natural human tendency of that player is to not work as hard putting energy into the saxophone via air pressure and embouchure control since the "add on" device is doing part of that work for them. The net result to the listener across the room is a less intense and robust sound. Think about it. The "wetting your pants" wearing a dark suit analogy fits quite nicely. It gives you a warm feeling, but nobody else notices any difference. :)

You may want to put the "snake oil" to a valid test, before encouraging others to go out and spend their money like you did. A decent acoustic measurement microphone and a low cost software spectrum analyzer are all you need to get started. You can pick up a Behringer ECM8000 for $60 at Sweetwater.

Find a way to support the weight of your sax (sax stand on a table?) and put on a blindfold. Have a friend add or remove the device in random order between each playing trial so you don't know when it is on or off. Your friend can record your observations following each trial. You can also invite a group of other sax players to be subject listeners to the test. Of course you would need to put up some sort of screen so the listeners can't tell whether the device is on or off. Record their observations as well. Do your best to play the same example the same way each time so as not to skew the results.

This listening test, along with the spectrogram produced by playing long tones into the measurement mic. should provide some valuable information. I have had this discussion with Eric Satterlee at Meridian Winds about the weighted neck screw and I am still waiting for the results of the tests he said he would perform---not holding my breath. :)
 

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