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I was in a local used bookstore the other day and found an interesting old book with some saxophone pictures in it. It's titled "Music Notation And Terminology" by Karl W. Gehrkens. I have not read this book but I suspect the author to be German. The copyright date is 1914. While most of the book is about chords, chord progressions, the reading of music and ect, there is a section that describes musical instruments. The saxophone (which had yet to be widely popularized) did get a spot in the book. I thought of no group to better share this with than the people of SOTW. I do apologize for the poor quality of the pictures. If requested I will take better pictures and repost them later.


The cover of the book

Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass (Actually a baritone, noticed the fixed neck)





This isn't a saxophone, but I found this picture of a sarrusaphone interesting enough to include. Notice that the soprano and the bari are only keyed to high Eb. I would love to know what kind of horns these are, and if anyone knows please post.

There was only a small passage mentioning the sax, most of it being about clarinet. It reads "...but the saxophone is usually made of metal,and, the tone being more strident and penetrating, the instrument is ordinarily used on in combination with other wind instruments, i.e., in bands."

Thanks for reeding (terrible pun)
Feel free to comment
 

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Nothing - brass was "it."

The sax was still unusual enough (especially among conservatory types and musicologists) that all kinds of beliefs made it into print. "Strident and penetrating"? With those barrel chamber, no baffle mouthpieces? No way...

BTW, the pictures are of low-B instruments - definitely from the 1890s or before. In fact that might be the Buffet trademark shown on them.
 

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Well I was just curious because it said usually. I mean, wouldn't that insinuate that they are made out of other things?
 

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Not necessarily. It might just insinuate that Karl W. Gehrkens was talking out of his @ss and too dignified to admit it. After all, the sax was a [email protected] instrument at this point, so why not make stuff up about it?
 

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I think you were right about ol' Karl. That "bass" looks curiously like a baritone to me. And the saxophones are obviously generic in nature, given the way the bell pads are drawn. DAVE
 

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BTW, the pictures are of low-B instruments - definitely from the 1890s or before. In fact that might be the Buffet trademark shown on them.
Saxes keyed to low B were sold after the turn of the century as well.

Although the illustrations obviously weren't meant to be exact, it looks like the alto/tenor have modern side keys (Bb C and E). Generally, this was found on saxes after ~1890.
 
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