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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi is there an opinion on those Padguards sold for tenor and Alto saxes.
Pad guard.jpg

Are they useful or do they cause problems due to the microfibers that they are made out of. I have a few of them but have been told not to use them anymore by my repairer; so I am thinking of throwing them in the dustbin if they are causing more harm than good.

Your expertise would be appreciated.

Thanks,

-Raef
 

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Raef: I tossed mine years ago. Besides the theoretical fibers-stuck-to-tone-hole-rims issues, I thought mine did no good, and were a problems with gathering schmutze, smelling badly, and just an un-nescessary additional item that had to be dealt with when I took the horn out of its case to play it. I've gotten along just fine without them for years now. HoweverDAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay, I have had mine for years too. But was suddenly told not to use the Pad Saver along side with, not to use Brasso to shine my horn. I have never had issues with the Pad Saver becoming moldy or smelly. In-fact it has been downright convenient. But thanks for you comment.
 

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Here we go again. :)

The pad savers are not all alike. There are/were several brands that gave them all a bad reputation---especially those that come with Chinese saxophones along with the white gloves. The ones to use are the HW brand. I am professional saxophone repair tech and I have used these in my own saxes for over 20 years. The HW brand has special fibers that "wick" the moisture from the walls and toneholes to the inside of the wand. My system after playing is to insert and remove the pad saver 2 or 3 times and then run the fibers through my hand. If it feels moist, I will set it on top of the sax in the case till it dries. Most of the time it doesn't feel moist at all, and it is stored inside the saxophone.

In my experience, those who have the most negative opinions of the pad savers are those who have "heard they are bad" and have never used a HW pad saver themselves.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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The so-called pad savers are OK if they are made of something that helps to wick the moisure off the pads, and you subesequently remove it to allow the inside to of the horn to dry out. However if they are crappy ones and don't absorb the moisture, and ( worse) shed bits of fibre all over the place then no - not a good thing.

If you get a decently made one, such as the HW brand, then you should have no problems.

I've never heard then callerd a pad "guard" that sounds wrong to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here we go again. :)

The pad savers are not all alike. There are/were several brands that gave them all a bad reputation---especially those that come with Chinese saxophones along with the white gloves. The ones to use are the HW brand. I am professional saxophone repair tech and I have used these in my own saxes for over 20 years. The HW brand has special fibers that "wick" the moisture from the walls and toneholes to the inside of the wand. My system after playing is to insert and remove the pad saver 2 or 3 times and then run the fibers through my hand. If it feels moist, I will set it on top of the sax in the case till it dries. Most of the time it doesn't feel moist at all, and it is stored inside the saxophone.

In my experience, those who have the most negative opinions of the pad savers are those who have "heard they are bad" and have never used a HW pad saver themselves.
Thanks Saxoclese, I always bought the most expensive Pads Savers from a reputable shop. It was my guess that the repairer was talking bull as I was never able to get my Bottom Bb to work after one of his 'repairs.' :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The so-called pad savers are OK if they are made of something that helps to wick the moisure off the pads, and you subesequently remove it to allow the inside to of the horn to dry out. However if they are crappy ones and don't absorb the moisture, and ( worse) shed bits of fibre all over the place then no - not a good thing.

If you get a decently made one, such as the HW brand, then you should have no problems.

I've never heard then callerd a pad "guard" that sounds wrong to me.

I looked up the name on the net as I couldn't remember the name of the thingy ...
 

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Opps I'll have to get used to taking it out after a gig. When I come home I usually live it in until I play the next morning. K
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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I use stuffers in every sax, except the baritone only has a long flexible one that is a swab for the upper loop and I take it out when done. The soprano also has just one I put in from the bell and leave in. Alto and tenor have one for the neck, the body and the bell. These things have saved the day for me as the pads last much longer and the saxes stay clean inside. All I have to do is hand-wash the stuffers about every year. I'm only playing about 20 gigs a year now plus rehearsals and my practice, but when I was playing two or three times that often it was the same, just had to wash and dry them more often. I clean and treat my own pads and I've never noticed and stray fibers on them. However I did discover some fuzzy black stuff on my soprano that I labeled 'club webs' LOL. I would be better off if I kept the outside as clean as the inside. :)
Years ago I would take my sax apart yearly and wash it out in the bathtub. Since then I wised up and never have to do that anymore. I maintain the exterior with Pledge spray wax - spray on, wipe off. I still have to take the saxes apart every few years to clean and do minor maintenance but I never will put one in water again. Oops, there is an exception to that - when I use a corrosion remover I have to rinse it off. If I do have to wet a disassembled horn, I'll use WD-40 to displace any water and prevent rust on springs and other steel parts. Its easy to wipe off the excess and it doesn't hurt anything to just leave it.
But yes, I would be lost without my stuffers, and now that I have five saxes, I would be working on them all the time if I didn't have them. Plus, after a gig when I may have up to four saxes there, its really fast to put them away with the stuffers as opposed to trying to get a swab through them. In my situation I need to get my horns put away fast because the other guys start tearing down after the last note of the night and they are incredibly clumsy oafs.
Caveat: to get the maximum efficiency out of them you must start with a clean sax. Putting a stuffer into a horn with a heavy slime layer is really gross.
 

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Here we go again. :)

The pad savers are not all alike. There are/were several brands that gave them all a bad reputation---especially those that come with Chinese saxophones along with the white gloves. The ones to use are the HW brand. I am professional saxophone repair tech and I have used these in my own saxes for over 20 years. The HW brand has special fibers that "wick" the moisture from the walls and toneholes to the inside of the wand. My system after playing is to insert and remove the pad saver 2 or 3 times and then run the fibers through my hand. If it feels moist, I will set it on top of the sax in the case till it dries. Most of the time it doesn't feel moist at all, and it is stored inside the saxophone.

In my experience, those who have the most negative opinions of the pad savers are those who have "heard they are bad" and have never used a HW pad saver themselves.
I agree - the HW Pad-Saver and Hollywoodwinds Pad Dryer are good products. The Rico product not so much. I typically pull a Hodge silk and/or BG micro-fiber pull-through swab through first then finish things off with my HW Pad-Savers. The pull-through swabs take care of 80+% of the moister and the pad-saver pulls what's left out of the tone hole chimneys. The pull-through actually removes most of the moister from the horn before the pad-saver ever goes in so it doesn't ever get very wet and there's no moister trapped inside the horn. I find this combination only takes a few seconds more than just using a pull through and is significantly better than either by themselves if you are going to bother to swab your horn at all.
 
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