Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hello, does anyone have a list of saxophone repertoire that is written by LGBT+ composers? I already know of the Dahl and Rorem but that's about it, surely there is more music out there?

Thanks

[ADMIN EDIT] For those replying who did not read the thread apart from the title or this post, the OP has clarified in a later post, quoted here:

"I'm working on programming my Senior Recital for next year and I am wanting to play music by LGBT composers which is why I'm interested. Thanks!"


[ADMIN EDIT] All posts (however well intentioned) that say it doesn't matter will be deleted, purely because there have been so many and however true in social or personal contexts this misses the point of the thread, which is about an academic recital for which the question is relevant. We also want to avoid getting into politics.

We all know that in many contexts it doesn't matter, no need to keep telling everyone!

Please keep all replies on topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
There is an interesting story about Billy Tipton (1914-1989). There's a Wikipedia entry for her. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Tipton

I read another story about her somewhere that was much more interesting. I'm not sure if she composed, but her story is interesting if you can find something that isn't from a tabloid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,551 Posts
Chester Biscardi has a work for solo soprano called "No Feeling is the Same as Before": https://chesterbiscardi.com/product/no-feeling-is-the-same-as-before/

Gareth Farr has a piece (actually a transcription of a viola piece) called Meditation: https://edition-peters.com/product/meditation/prepe125 He's also written a few sax quartet pieces.

Michael Finnissy has some mixed ensemble works featuring saxophones. There's also a Cowell work, Air and Scherzo. Lou Harrison wrote "A Cornish Lancaran" for American gamelan and soprano. I think that Nico Muhly has some mixed ensemble works for saxophone as well. Jennifer Higdon has a quartet, concerto, and sonata.

If serialism is more your thing, Wuorinen has a few works:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,381 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Again, maybe not quite in the genre you're seeking, but Shania Twain hits the spot with "Man! I feel like a Woman". Apparently, the title and thus the lyrics of the song were based on Twain's experience while working at Deerhurst Resort in Huntsville, Ontario to provide for her brothers and sisters after their parents died in a car crash. Twain recalls seeing some drag performers working at the resort and credits them as the source of her inspiration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Richard Rodney Bennet wrote two sax concerti, a quartet, a sonata for soprano&piano, and a short set of 3 pieces for alto and piano.
If you wanna wait a bit John Corigliano is apparently working on a saxophone concerto, according to an NPR interview recently.
Also Benjamin Britten authorized people playing his 6 Metamorphoses after Ovid on Soprano sax.
(+1 on Odsum and John's reccomendations (although like he said, probably looking for classical stuff given subforum this is in), and for Blue Dog's mentioning Tipton, as I've never heard of him before now.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,793 Posts
Don't know, don't care, it's totally irrelevant.
Maybe not. We've had specific threads on composers and players who are female, Christian, Muslim, Japanese, Irish, and all manner of ethnic, religious, or national identities. This thread's relevant for exactly the same reason: because people with different identities have differing experiences that may not only influence their music in interesting ways, but also inspire different audiences.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,707 Posts
Maybe not. We've had specific threads on composers and players who are female, Christian, Muslim, Japanese, Irish, and all manner of ethnic, religious, or national identities. This thread's relevant for exactly the same reason: because people with different identities have differing experiences that may not only influence their music in interesting ways, but also inspire different audiences.
I guess i dont care about any of those divisions. It seems to me that such a focus distracts from the nature of music being a universal language that is all inclusive. Having spent my life in the arts...when I read the title i kinda thought it might be easier to name the composers that didnt fit in the OP category. No one with any sense will deny the lgbt participation and contributions to the arts....or any set of peoples for that matter.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,903 Posts
I believe that sexual orientation/preference in the context of everyday professional and social interaction doesn't matter (in other words we treat people of whatever race, religion, sexual orientation with respect and don't discriminate). I'm sure this goes without saying for us positing here.

However this is a nonetheless a valid topic for a thread. These days it's also valid area of academic research.

I'm just wondering if the thread may be in danger of being derailed if it goes off into other areas of discussion (not that we shouldn't be able to have those discussions, but probably not in this thread)

Seems to me it's a legitimate question born out of interest, and I see no reason to question the topic's validity or assume any other agenda.

It may not be an easy question to answer fully when looking back to less enlightened times when it was shameful and often dangerous to be publically homosexual. - e.g. Tchaikovsky who I believe did write for saxophone.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,707 Posts
I guess to me its so common place in the arts...plus the way it was asked really did not suggest that it was anything other than mere curiosity (which is fine for its own sake). If this is part of someones paper, a study, a correlation with some overall concept it would be interesting. If it is, we have not been enlightened. If it is, I think it could be interesting.

As it stands its just one of 8 million questions. Not bad, not good...just lacking a context to actually have a discussion.

Its like me asking who were the famous left hand saxophone players...Im betting the first response would be "Why do you care and why does it matter?"
Same on this thread.

Id love to see this discussion...but there is currently nothing to discuss. Somehow I bet the OP has something in mind. It would be cool if he/she shared so we could participate rather than just provide data. Sadly I have no data to share with the OP but I think a social discussion (kept in bounds) would be interesting.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,903 Posts
Id love to see this discussion...but there is currently nothing to discuss. Somehow I bet the OP has something in mind. It would be cool if he/she shared so we could participate rather than just provide data. Sadly I have no data to share with the OP but I think a social discussion (kept in bounds) would be interesting.
I agree, and I can see that with further context from the OP why the thread would stay more nicely on track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
The reason it matters is because it is finally something people are becoming OK with even talking about or hearing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,736 Posts
The reason it matters is because it is finally something people are becoming OK with even talking about or hearing.
I could not care less who writes the music, what color they are, what underwear they have on, etc. I care about whether I enjoy the music. The rest is just fluff.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
I could not care less who writes the music, what color they are, what underwear they have on, etc. I care about whether I enjoy the music. The rest is just fluff.
I was involved as a composer / musician (along with a pianist from Korea) in a project called "East Meets West". We sourced the musicians from around the world, and used a variety of ethnic instruments - The diverse racial background of the players had a huge impact on the music. We didn't use a score - instead we went through the changes with them in the studio and let them express themselves as they saw fit. ...music (and smiles) were the only way some of us could communicate, but the project had a decidedly, "ethnic" feel

I can't really see sexual orientation having such an impact, but it might have some kind of effect.... I would guess Freddie Mercury's contributions to the group "Queen", was influenced in some way by his sexuality....


EDIT
Disclaimer: I am NOT LGBT or even BLT, so my opinions on this have no basis in personal experience...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,736 Posts
I was involved as a composer / musician (along with a pianist from Korea) in a project called "East Meets West". We sourced the musicians from around the world, and used a variety of ethnic instruments - The diverse racial background of the players had a huge impact on the music. We didn't use a score - instead we went through the changes with them in the studio and let them express themselves as they saw fit. ...music (and smiles) were the only way some of us could communicate, but the project had a decidedly, "ethnic" feel

I can't really see sexual orientation having such an impact, but it might have some kind of effect.... I would guess Freddie Mercury's contributions to the group "Queen", was influenced in some way by his sexuality....


EDIT
Disclaimer: I am NOT LGBT or even BLT, so my opinions on this have no basis in personal experience...
In the case of Queen, I would say lyrics were influenced but music is music is music. No effect there. Good band, BTW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
If you wanna wait a bit John Corigliano is apparently working on a saxophone concerto, according to an NPR interview recently.
Wow, that's excellent news. I really like his Red Violin score and the Chaconne and then full Violin Concerto that he derived from it. Plus, it never hurts to have a "name" composer write for the sax.
 
1 - 20 of 64 Posts
Top