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Acoustical Foundations of Music

Although not limited to the saxophone, "The Acoustical Foundations of Music" by John Backus is a fantastic book for anyone interested in the subject.

-DH
 

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probably one of the most quoted link ever in the history of SOTW quoted in countless threads before
 

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In addition to the excellent UNSW website for those just starting out learning about saxophone acoustics "The Saxophone is my Voice" by Ernest Ferron is a good place to start. He doesn't get everything right and a lot of new information has come out since the book was published, but there are a lot of useful basics in layman's terms that are accessible to most people without a physics background and provides a good foundation for further learning.

To dive deeper into the subject Gary Scavone's thesis is a comprehensive overview although there is quite a lot of math presented. Those without a physics background like myself can glean a lot of information by reading "between the math" and reading abstracts and summaries and conclusions in research papers. Another interesting study by Dalmont and others is "Some Aspects of Tuning and Clean Intonation in Reed Instruments" that describes the role "harmonicity" plays in how an instrument sounds and responds. Another study by Scavone and LeFebvre is "A Comparison of Saxophone Impedances and Their Playing Behavior". The latest research on the effects of "wall vibrations" in reed instruments can be found here "Influence of Wall Vibrations on a Simplified Reed Instrument".
 

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In addition to the excellent UNSW website for those just starting out learning about saxophone acoustics "The Saxophone is my Voice" by Ernest Ferron is a good place to start. He doesn't get everything right and a lot of new information has come out since the book was published, but there are a lot of useful basics in layman's terms that are accessible to most people without a physics background and provides a good foundation for further learning.

To dive deeper into the subject Gary Scavone's thesis is a comprehensive overview although there is quite a lot of math presented. Those without a physics background like myself can glean a lot of information by reading "between the math" and reading abstracts and summaries and conclusions in research papers. Another interesting study by Dalmont and others is "Some Aspects of Tuning and Clean Intonation in Reed Instruments" that describes the role "harmonicity" plays in how an instrument sounds and responds. Another study by Scavone and LeFebvre is "A Comparison of Saxophone Impedances and Their Playing Behavior". The latest research on the effects of "wall vibrations" in reed instruments can be found here "Influence of Wall Vibrations on a Simplified Reed Instrument".
Thanks for the brain candy!
 

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The Math is what makes it valid instead of just noise or a sales pitch, by the way.
 
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