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Discussion Starter #1
I did a clean-up and lube, triggered by a broken spring on my Saxello. All pads were still really good, no replacing any of those. The overall action is now much better than before and everything plays great except for low C and B. To be more specific, at Db a very slight warble starts which gets worse at C and then better again at B. Bb plays perfectly fine.

I checked for leaks, can't see anything. I used the latex glove suction test, it holds the vacuum pretty well. Been up and down the horn half a dozen times now, replaced another weak spring on one of the side keys and nothing seems to work.

I may be overlooking the obvious but I am kind of at the end of my wisdom / ideas.

Thanks
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Is this a real Saxello or a modern tipped-bell soprano?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's a real one, and yes, they are notorious for all kinds of issues but after many, many tiny adjustments it plays better than "almost" in tune and it has that incredibly gorgeous sound of a real Saxello that was never replicated by any of the modern tipped-bells.
 

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Ok, it starts going away just by playing it hard all the way up and down the range. :)
That doesn't change anything acoustically... so lots of options. Maybe you are adjusting to it (most likely), or pressing pads harder to overcome a leak, or the playing creates a temporary deeper seat on the pads so they seal, etc. It's anyone's guess.

Re the B and C notes specifically, the King Saxello has a weird design (it's an acoustic desgin flaw as far as I'm concerned) with extremely small lowest tone hole and quite small tone hole above it too. The B is a terrible note because of that and the C is borderline... sometimes ok, depends how it feels to you. I guess the last tone hole needs to be far enough from the end for support and that's why it has this size and location. Increasing size would also mean moving it a bit lower. Assuming it couldn't be closer to the joint, they could have made the tube extra long, then cut it after making the tone hole... but maybe cost (probably) or some other production issue prevented that.
 

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A common cause of a "warble" in the low notes of a soprano is that the mouthpiece is not pushed far enough onto the cork. You might try pushing the mouthpiece on farther to see if the warble goes away. The tuning can then be corrected somewhat by playing lower on the mouthpiece input pitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That doesn't change anything acoustically... so lots of options. Maybe you are adjusting to it (most likely), or pressing pads harder to overcome a leak, or the playing creates a temporary deeper seat on the pads so they seal, etc. It's anyone's guess.

Re the B and C notes specifically, the King Saxello has a weird design (it's an acoustic desgin flaw as far as I'm concerned) with extremely small lowest tone hole and quite small tone hole above it too. The B is a terrible note because of that and the C is borderline... sometimes ok, depends how it feels to you. I guess the last tone hole needs to be far enough from the end for support and that's why it has this size and location. Increasing size would also mean moving it a bit lower. Assuming it couldn't be closer to the joint, they could have made the tube extra long, then cut it after making the tone hole... but maybe cost (probably) or some other production issue prevented that.
Thank you!

Playing it / wearing it in after complete disassembly, reassembly may change the seats on the pads again to a precise line up with the tone holes, my original assumption was that something had shifted and if it is only for a fraction of a millimeter and now they are wearing in again. I am saying this because I did not change the pads and the seats were there, albeit with some minor gunk that just develops over time and which I cleaned off (thinking aloud here).

Otherwise, I agree on every count, especially the dual cup C-hole is an invitation for disaster.

Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A common cause of a "warble" in the low notes of a soprano is that the mouthpiece is not pushed far enough onto the cork. You might try pushing the mouthpiece on farther to see if the warble goes away. The tuning can then be corrected somewhat by playing lower on the mouthpiece input pitch.
Thank you!

I did experiment with the mouthpiece position and the axial rotation and I can make the problem worse but not completely eliminate it. It only happens now in the lower register. I can almost eliminate it now by raising the horn to the point where it becomes uncomfortable to play. But you are definitely right, it is the geometry at the very beginning of the air path that seems to be the culprit. Moving to a synthetic reed (Forestone) also helps a bit but it "castrates" the sound and the nuances. I will check the octave bibs one more time as well.

Happy Thanksgiving!
 
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