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100% agreed. Sax fingered oboes are dreadful. Steer clear at all costs. Same with single reed oboe mouthpieces. If you are really interested in an oboe, buy the very best model you can afford and above all take the advice of a good pro oboe player. There are maybe 10-12 good oboe makers, and about 6 absolutely top-class:-

Howarth
Loree
Rigoutat
Marigaux
Puchner
Buffet

come to mind, in no particular order. There are some excellent lesser known instruments and up-and-coming makes too, so this is not an exhaustive list by any means. :)
As an saxophonist turned full time oboist I actually want to expand on your list so I'm going to add my opinion and do my best to order them. Yes this is only my personal opinion, however I think it is a solid one ;).

Rigoutat
Hiniker (if you can find it!)
Buffet
Laubin (7 year waiting list but a GREAT oboe)
Loree
Marigaux
Howarth
Josef
Fox
Yamaha
Bulgheroni
Covey

Keep in mind that only in America is Loree a top choice. In 1994 at the Oboe Blow Out they did a 'blind oboe' test. Rigoutat was at the top by far with Loree at the very bottom.

Sometimes I wish oboe only had as many viable brands as saxophone...classically speaking :)

Check out this for more information on some of the other brands
http://www.oboes.us/resources/makers.html

and most importantly of all...be sure to try the oboe you want. If you're going to invest the time into doubling (or converting) to oboe you want to get the instrument that you enjoy...not what other people tell you to play.

As far as the original topic...i would be very worried about a saxophone system oboe. How would the extended range work? Could it still reach the double C? Would pitch tendency change? The fact that you would lose the 2nd octave key (side key) would be a *nightmare* to me. You'd lose all your harmonic fingerings (scary!) I guess I'm probably a little more oboe-y than the typical doubler but i'd be scared of those things.
 

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I think this is even starting to change. I could be wrong but in my *limited* experience the german youth are switching to the semi-automatic system as they advance in studies. What little advantage that comes with the automatic for 2nd octave A/B/C is lost when you approach the upper range. Also they can't play harmonics off the second octave which is extremely usefull (first movement of the Britten 6 metamorphosis for example)

Also, now most thumblate systems are made as a dual-system so that with the thumb key pressed you have the the thumb plate system and without it you have a standard conservatory.

Marigaux oboes have been using the third octave key since 1950 i think. It caught on in a lot of europe but did not become standard in the US until the 80s or so? It is not needed but can be helpful for some high notes. Its still debatable as to exactly where the third octave key does best. For me, someone who has never had a third octave key, I find that I *never* use it. I get by ok but I also tend to stay in a more modest range and rarely go above the "altissimo" G.

In short a "sax-system" would only be useful for someone who has learned saxophone first. There are already several options to be brought up on oboe. Truth be told most people who play oboe don't switch from saxophone so for the money in the investment of the machines to make new keywork/bores/tone hole drilling etc... it would make for an extremely expensive oboe that was only of marginal use to the sax-oboe public. I did not start playing oboe seriously until I was 22 (i was brought up a very serious classical saxophonist...hours of practice a day on scales and the whole nine yards) but I adapted very quickly. I think it is more realistic to have a saxophonist take the extra 10 hours to switch their pinky tendency around and get used to half-holing etc.. Unless you have a small fortune to invest i suppose...

Also, chris do you really lift your first finger off for the half holes? How does that work for you? For me I cant imagine being able to keep my technique clean for something like the Rossini La Scala di Seta when you're double tonguing sixteenth note scale passages all over the half hole. The pivot is such a quick motion that I don't think I personally could even come close to the same speed. How is intonation changed? Do you ever get funky sounds for articulation? My first key doesn't open a big distance but its really finicky for me. If i don't treat it well it doesn't treat me well!
 
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