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Don't know anything about that Mic....so......

If that is your budget, then maybe consider getting a Shure 57 or 58 instead.

You could get a XLR to USB thing, but you really want to record in 24bit and at least 44.1Khz, here would be better (96Khz is better).

You really have to give a "budget" for what you want to do. If you just want simple, easy recording, get something like an Audio-Technica AT2020 USB. It does 16bit/44.1 recording but I've heard it and it sounds good for the price.

Anything else, like if you want that mic you mentioned, then you have to consider a preamp, etc, etc......it's complicated. You can probably search the forum for more info


So I think I'm going to get this mic:

Electro-Voice N/D468
https://www.google.com/search?q=Ele...rome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#q=Electro-Voice+N/D468

I need some help! What do I need to get going? I'd like to hook this up to my computer. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Cables?
Some Interface to the computer?
Do I need a preamp?
Is there a "go-to" mic stand?
 

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That mic is a good one for saxes, better than the Shure, if you consider the thread just down there http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?200776-Great-Sax-Mic
I just bought one, and it really is.
You will need some kind of an audio interface in wich you plug your mic, and something to record on your computer (audacity, garage band, or anything else)
There is a lot of audio interfaces from many companies at different price ranges. Some with lot of features, some without any. See by yourself what you need and what you can afford.
I have 3 to 4 interfaces, one I paid $200 and another I paid $40 (used), and both works well.
 

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Often, when you buy a hardware interface, the manufacturer will include basic DAW software. It should be enough to get you started.
 

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I just upgraded a Shure SM57 to the EV N/D468 - much better mike.
Shure makes a very slick XLR to USB converter with a nice headphone monitor. You can use it with any Digital recording software.
And for that software, Audacity is very slick, very easy to use, and very free.
$149 for the mike, $99 for the converter, a pair of headphones and you're in business. You can pick up a mike stand most anywhere for around $30.

To start out, you can use backing tracks from posts on this site, from youtube, from books like Aebersold. As you progress, you may want to get some kind of software to create your own.
 

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Shure makes a very slick XLR to USB converter with a nice headphone monitor. You can use it with any Digital recording software. And for that software, Audacity is very slick, very easy to use, and very free. $149 for the mike, $99 for the converter, a pair of headphones and you're in business.
This is why I subscribed to this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just upgraded a Shure SM57 to the EV N/D468 - much better mike.
Shure makes a very slick XLR to USB converter with a nice headphone monitor. You can use it with any Digital recording software.
And for that software, Audacity is very slick, very easy to use, and very free.
$149 for the mike, $99 for the converter, a pair of headphones and you're in business. You can pick up a mike stand most anywhere for around $30.

To start out, you can use backing tracks from posts on this site, from youtube, from books like Aebersold. As you progress, you may want to get some kind of software to create your own.
Thanks for this! I think I'll grab the EV468, Shure X2c XLR to USB, a stand, and a shock mount. Then I can start recording and see how it goes. I can read into this stuff and buy more if necessary later on.
 

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I just got a Bayerdynamic M 201 TG mic and I use a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 and Reaper for my software. The recordings in my SoundCloud were done with a Shure Beta 98 H, but this Bayerdynamic sounds WAY better and much more natural. The hard part I have found is good mic placement and learning the room sound and how to make the needed adjustments when they are needed.

Reaper is pretty much free, and the Scarlett 2i2 is not very expensive comparably. The mic you are looking at is a great sax mic.
 

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When you do start recording, here is one very important tip. Record 'dry' and add the effects later, This will make you play with the best tone and articulation you can muster. I got this tidbit years ago in this section by some pros. Trust me it works.
 

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Don't be tempted just to place the mic pointed down the bell, placement will depend hugely on the room, the mic, the player and the sound you are looking for, but a good tip I got is to aim more at your upper hand and have it maybe a foot and a half out. There is plenty of discussion around on this, but its all too easy just to point the mic down the bell and get a horrible sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I ended up getting:

EV N/D 468
M Audio M-Track Plus
SRH440 with SRH940 pads
Monoprice XLR cable
Some generic mic stand

I can't control the room much. I live in a "smallish" nyc apartment. I'll try recording at my parent's house too to see if it changes anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I ended up getting:

EV N/D 468
M Audio M-Track Plus
SRH440 with SRH940 pads
Monoprice XLR cable
Some generic mic stand

I can't control the room much. I live in a "smallish" nyc apartment. I'll try recording at my parent's house too to see if it changes anything.
I just got the stuff and it sounds great. The mic is definitely a quality mic for recording sax. It sounds awesome!!
 

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If you're capturing too much "room noise" you can put up some cheap acoustic barriers or even heavy blankets and such on the walls/ceiling to help calm it down. If it's just a dead room then that's not too bad since you can fix that after recording. An untreated room that sounds bad is VERY difficult to tame, but a dead room isn't the worst thing in the world. Obviously a nice, naturally good sounding room is ideal but that can be hard to obtain.
 

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I ended up getting:

EV N/D 468
M Audio M-Track Plus
SRH440 with SRH940 pads
Monoprice XLR cable
Some generic mic stand

I can't control the room much. I live in a "smallish" nyc apartment. I'll try recording at my parent's house too to see if it changes anything.


Nice little starter setup. Why not also make a portable booth from acoustic tiles. seriously thats all it takes at it`s most basic just ONE tile on a mic stand infront would suffice but side tiles would make it correct.


Advice . Not to be taken as gospel. I`d try and start out using an Industry standard DAW. Lot`s of folks will evangelize the hobbyist ones which although great tend to employ custom user interfaces and cludges .If you learn on one of the big names ( including LE releases) then the time investment will be transferable if you are forced to migrate to another DAW .

It`s funny but most folks start off by saying "I`m only wanting to use it as a basic tape recorder" until they get caught by the bug and by that stage they are thinking about integrating outboard gear,( MIDI) , Soft synths, ,sample manipulation and programming mastering & automated mixdown, Nearly ALL of the biggies are pretty comprehensive regarding these abilities but many of the indie software suites are restrictive. Just Saying
 
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