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These players in the recording are all three playing the same instrument and I can clearly hear the "Sound" difference between Dexter Gordan and Sonny Rollins can't you? Bebop language is basically the same but yet they "Sound" different. At some point they developed their own sound. Our most natural sound can be uniquely our own. Guys used to get criticized for copying to much of other players sounds. Parker told Lee Konitz "At least you're playing your own sh*t".
If you can, use the Time Line to indicate when Sonny Rollins is playing vs Dexter Gordan. Include Booker Irving if you like. Or at least mark when a different musician is playing. For some it might sound like one continuous Tenor solo but most Sax players should hear the difference. Go for it!

Booker Ervin - Sonny Rollins - Dexter Gordon Berlin 1965
 

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You can also do this with James Williams Meets the Saxophone Masters (Sony 1993) with Joe Henderson, George Coleman, and Bill Pierce. Fun to figure out who is taking which solo, although they each have very distinctive sounds.
 

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Exactly, you get it! They each have distinctive sounds that they developed and stayed with. If anyone can share with us recordings of Sax jams please share. For example two or more Altos, Sopranos and Tenors on the same stage or record.
Ok...so now let us Watch and Listen to four different well know sax players influenced by and mimic John Coltrane. If this was just a audio recording it might be hard for some listeners to know that it wasn't Trane. Although it's four different players it sounds like one long John Coltrane solo.The point is that we all know the Coltrane Sound. Michael Brecker totally absorbed the Coltrane sound and eventually Rocked It - Funked it- and Fused it into his own sound. Other players insert some Trane from time to time but also use other great players to draw from to enhance and develop their own sound. In the beginning we all have our own sound otherwise no sound would be coming out of the instrument. That sound simply develops and matures but is still our sound. It might even change but it's still coming from the same source...us. Any comments? Do you feel that they all played Trane well? Did anyone stand out? Did the spirit of John Coltrane just move from player to player equally?

Impressions - M.Brecker/D.Liebman/G.Garzone/J.Redman
 
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