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Hello all!

I'm going on vacation to the beach next month, and long story short I'm planning on playing my sax around the area. Will it suffer from lacquer degeneration or pad issues from the salt water and air? I would only bring my secondary sax, a Cannonball Student model, but I still need it in working order. Is it worth it and will it be alright at the beach?

Thank you!!
 

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You might get a tiny splotches of rust on the springs and some slightly accelerated lacquer loss and pitting, but nothing that wouldn't happen anyway. It'll just happen a tad faster. Plenty of people live near the water (moi) and play out and around.
Just swab it out and don't play anywhere you're literally getting sprayed by waves and you should be okay.
 

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If you play outside, I'd be worried about getting bits of sand in the pads. One gust of sandy air and you're looking at a horn needing a full re-pad. If you only play indoors, you should not have any problems.
 

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If you play outside, I'd be worried about getting bits of sand in the pads. One gust of sandy air and you're looking at a horn needing a full re-pad.
Don't know if you'd need a total repad, but you'd certainly be looking at some substantial cleaning to get the sand out of the keys, posts, screws, etc...could be a significant chunk of change in its own right.

I usually use one of my backup instruments when I have to do an outdoor gig. The closer to the ocean I'm playing, the more likely I am to do this...
 

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I took mine on a 10 day cruise through the Carribean with no ill effects.
 

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Pick up a $100 alto for the trip and future outings. Many of my customers here in Miami have 3 horns, the good one, the one for seedy clubs and the outdoor in the rain at the beach horn.
 

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just don't drop it in the sand....otherwise it'll be fine....a cannonball student model anyways,so no worries....
cheers,philip
 

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I have a 15 year old Series III tenor that I played in the salt air for about once a month for about 8 years, and it definitely took a lacquer beating. I kind of like it though; once I got the green corrosion cleaned off with some brasso, my horn sure looks a lot more vintage than 15 years old!
 

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Back in the "old days" ...for me it is the mid-70's, I am sure earlier for others ... I don't recall myself or others worrying about things like this ... Bought my Mark VI tenor in '73 and have taken it everywhere with me for the past 41 years ... yes it does look like it has seen wear but I always took reasonable care (the occasional swabbing, the occasional wipe down) ... then again, I bought the horn to work for me. I bought a Selmer because at that time I heard it was the best and it could take the rigors of 4 or 5 night a week rock and roll gigs in all kinds of circumstances ... never really considered whatever harm could come from sand, humidity, cold, mosquitos, bees, lions, salt or groupies ... perhaps the best $600 I ever invested ... I am sure with minimal maintenance your Cannonball will be fine
 

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... Bought my Mark VI tenor in '73 and have taken it everywhere with me for the past 41 years ... yes it does look like it has seen wear but I always took reasonable care (the occasional swabbing, the occasional wipe down) ... then again, I bought the horn to work for me. I bought a Selmer because at that time I heard it was the best and it could take the rigors of 4 or 5 night a week rock and roll gigs in all kinds of circumstances ... never really considered whatever harm could come from sand, humidity, cold, mosquitos, bees, lions, salt or groupies ... perhaps the best $600 I ever invested ...
This aptly describes the last few VI's I've overhauled. Completely trashed, albeit after decades of playing on ships, outdoor gigs, beach gigs, seedy bars, not-so-seedy bars, falling off stage, falling off stage while still attached to its inebriated owner, falling out of cars, air travel, and so forth. They keep on playing in spite of the abuse they suffer.

A lot of working pros visit me only when their horn finally reaches a state of total unplayability. With damage/corrosion repair, new pads and a thorough setup (mechanical overhaul), they spring right back to life, so we can put them through the mill all over again...

Allen, I don't know what the groupies have done to your horn...on second thought, I don't need to know... :mrgreen:
 
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