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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy folks,
So I've been repairing clarinets for many years and started delving in to saxophone repairs a few years back. Its been a wonderful experience and I'm learning more every day.
I'm going to be faced with something I haven't done yet soon.
I have an old Buescher True Tone tenor that I picked up that I plan on overhauling. Everything looks good but the neck tenon is loose, I can tell it was repaired sloppily by someone.
So I'm going to be taking it all apart and cleaning it up really well as a first step.
But I haven't done any large scale soldering up to this point, many posts, key guard feet, and even silver brazing keys (which I was already doing with clarinets anyway).
Typically with the smaller soldering jobs I will clean up, then get the some solder on the bottom of what I'm attaching (I believe this may be called tinning?), then proceed.

With such a big amount to solder I'm a little curious if there's a common approach to this.

Any tips or tricks? I probably won't be getting to this for a few weeks but I'm already thinking about it.

thanks,
Klook
 

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Tin both surfaces, but keep them relatively solder free.

Assemble the joint, turn the instrument upside down and rest it on the tenon, wrap a wet rag around the posts, heat with a broad flame the whole tenon, then bring your solder in, it should just flow around the whole circumference with no problems, if it doesnt add more flux.

Nothing more complicated than that

Steve
 

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... I have an old Buescher True Tone tenor that I picked up that I plan on overhauling. Everything looks good but the neck tenon is loose...
So I'm going to be taking it all apart.... But I haven't done any large scale soldering up to this point, many posts, key guard feet, and even silver brazing keys... With such a big amount to solder I'm a little curious if there's a common approach to this.
Umm... are you planning on removing all the soldered parts from the saxophone? !!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tin both surfaces, but keep them relatively solder free.

Assemble the joint, turn the instrument upside down and rest it on the tenon, wrap a wet rag around the posts, heat with a broad flame the whole tenon, then bring your solder in, it should just flow around the whole circumference with no problems, if it doesnt add more flux.

Nothing more complicated than that

Steve
You mention "turning the Instrument upside down" which makes me think you're talking about the reciever on the sax body, I'm needing to solder the tenon on the neck. Thanks for responding, I know once folks do something a million times it becomes second nature but I just haven't needed to do much soldering.
Klook
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
... I have an old Buescher True Tone tenor that I picked up that I plan on overhauling. Everything looks good but the neck tenon is loose...
So I'm going to be taking it all apart.... But I haven't done any large scale soldering up to this point, many posts, key guard feet, and even silver brazing keys... With such a big amount to solder I'm a little curious if there's a common approach to this.
Umm... are you planning on removing all the soldered parts from the saxophone? !!!
Oh no! I can see how you can read that, by tearing down I'm referring to the tenon/neck joint only.
Klook


O
 

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You mention "turning the Instrument upside down" which makes me think you're talking about the reciever on the sax body, I'm needing to solder the tenon on the neck. Thanks for responding, I know once folks do something a million times it becomes second nature but I just haven't needed to do much soldering.
Klook
Yes i was picturing the reciever socket for some reason

Same process, just set the tenon on the flat surface and hold the neck firmly into the socket, typically a ledge exists within the tenon.

Steve
 
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