Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was looking for a way to buffer the volume of my sax so I won't wake the kids up or irritate my wife terribly. I picked up some textured packing foam at work to see if that would take the edge off at all. NOPE. Not one dB according to my sound level meter app. Onward we trudge...

View attachment 236736
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
4,901 Posts
Much of the sound comes out of the open toneholes, so covering the bell will do next to nothing until you get to the bell keys. Actually, practicing softly does wonders for building up control in your airstream. Try playing as quietly as you can. You can still work on tone, pitch, and rhythm at soft volumes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Much of the sound comes out of the open toneholes, so covering the bell will do next to nothing until you get to the bell keys. Actually, practicing softly does wonders for building up control in your airstream. Try playing as quietly as you can. You can still work on tone, pitch, and rhythm at soft volumes.
Yeah, well, I had to try. I have read suggestions in other related posts along the lines of dropping a towel in the bell and other DIY bell mute suggestions. At this point in my practice (new to late-bloomer status), there is little soft, mostly HONK!


I did not recall from middle school band in the mid-80's how loud saxes are.

Thanks for the tips. I hope that someone gets a giggle at my expense.


Cheers!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
4,901 Posts
Yeah, well, I had to try. I have read suggestions in other related posts along the lines of dropping a towel in the bell and other DIY bell mute suggestions. At this point in my practice (new to late-bloomer status), there is little soft, mostly HONK!


I did not recall from middle school band in the mid-80's how loud saxes are.

Thanks for the tips. I hope that someone gets a giggle at my expense.


Cheers!
Oh, don't feel bad at all. We've all tried it at some point. There were a ton of "saxophone mutes" that were also being sold on eBay about a decade ago. They were next to useless, and were sold at a buy it now of $30 USD. Your solution was much cheaper, and you came to the same conclusion that the rest of us did. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
Just invent the audio equivalent of Vantablack, and lacquer your horn with it. Problem solved!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
888 Posts
Play into a closet, put the horn in between hanging garments. This will dampen the volume a bit.
+1

This is what I did while living in an apartment (before I got my WhisperRoom). I still do it when I have to practice while visiting family.

It works best when there are lots of clothes (obviously) and when you have a walk-in or other closet where you can close the door to create a sort of "room within a room".

I've also found that the sound reduction works much better with the smaller horns (e.g., soprano, alto) than with the larger ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
I know folks here will call BS, but I've tried this and it remedied a situation for me on a particular gig, so, real world experience. The gig is in a VERY live, loud and "chattery" room and management was CONSTANTLY bitching about the volume of the sax. I took a Crown Royal bag and put a wash cloth inside it to give it a bit more fluff, and put it in the bell. One thing I noticed is that it had a small effect on knocking down the volume, but the "highs" in my sound were greatly attenuated. This had the net effect of being less strident in the room. The complaints went away, I can actually play without feeling like I'm walking on eggshells, doesn't affect tuning (although of course low B and Bb are no longer available", and, most significantly, I still get paid.....
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top