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SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
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Discussion Starter #1
Over on Facebook, Sax Gordon posted about Charles Singleton's " 'one-note' " approach on "H-Bomb Boogie", with note of Red Prysock's on early rockers. Since Sax Gordon doesn't post here,
I'll pass this along.

Plus, great following track "Never Trust A Woman"...

 

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SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
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Hey Neil, thanks for sending that, but the link brings up a photo with a "play arrow" that doesn't play when clicked.
 

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SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
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Discussion Starter #3
Was told none of the tracks had been posted on YouTube. However, went back, searched, and finally found them. Also, tracks and album both available on iTunes.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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The 'one-note' approach can be crushing by the right player. I used to practice how many things I could do to one note. When I ran out of ideas, I would allow myself an octave. Fun. It appears in many solos on many records and every player has used it, like Stan Getz on 'One Note Samba', even though Bird made fun of it in the movie when he came across a jazz man playing rock & roll and grabbed his horn to see if it 'could play more than one note at a time' (this had to have been written by a non-sax player because the sax can play only one note at a time, but we all know what it meant). Like the tenor ride on the Temptations' 'Get Ready', there can really be a lot going on with that single note. King Curtis holding G3 for four measures near the end of his version of 'I Was Made To Love Her' will give you chill bumps. I gave myself chill bumps playing it many times.
 

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even though Bird made fun of it in the movie when he came across a jazz man playing rock & roll and grabbed his horn to see if it 'could play more than one note at a time' (this had to have been written by a non-sax player because the sax can play only one note at a time, but we all know what it meant).
Yeah, I'd be surprised if that whole scene wasn't completely made up for the movie. I'd bet anything Bird never made fun of anyone playing R&R sax at the time. He was actually known to have a very wide appreciation of music across all genres.

Neil, those links still aren't working for me (I get "video unavailable"). But I'll go look for them on YouTube. Thanks!
 
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