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hi everyone ,
i've got a question , what do you use for cleaning your saxes because i've seen lately some grey white spots on the top of some of my pads i thought it may be saliva if so what muss i do in this case with what can i clean up my sax like accesories or something
thanks in advance
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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A very slightly damp e-cloth or computer screen cloth or spectacles cloth is good. I don't recommend using any polishing or other products unless you have got grease or some other type of sadburge on your horn.

For pds use a wet Q tip or run a clean dollar bill or 5 pound note across the pad with the key gently held closed. For sticky pads use lighter fluid. I never use any pad powder or other gunk which I find only works in the short term. However some people have had success with various products.
 

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I never use any pad powder or other gunk which I find only works in the short term. However some people have had success with various products.
I think they only work in a manner similar to the process of an addiction. But yeah, great advice Pete.
 

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A very slightly damp e-cloth or computer screen cloth or spectacles cloth is good. I don't recommend using any polishing or other products unless you have got grease or some other type of sadburge on your horn.

For pds use a wet Q tip or run a clean dollar bill or 5 pound note across the pad with the key gently held closed. For sticky pads use lighter fluid. I never use any pad powder or other gunk which I find only works in the short term. However some people have had success with various products.
Sadburge? Translation please for those of us on the other side of the pond. :mrgreen:

For cleaning pads I use either clean water, Dr's Pad Cleaner, or Naptha (lighter fluid) depending on what foreign material has adhered to the pad's surface.

Please don't confuse Ultra Fine Teflon Powder used to treat pad sticking with the Selmer No Stick shown below. The Ultra Fine Teflon Powder when properly applied to the pad surface goes into the pores of the leather and creates a long lasting non-stick surface that actually repels moisture and other contaminants. The teflon particles which are only 3 microns in size do not stick to each other and form a paste like the Selmer No Stick product or other talc based powders do. The fact that more and more professional technicians are using the Ultra Fine PTFE (Teflon) to treat sticky pads attests to its safety and effectiveness. The only critics of this approach appear to be those who have never actually tried it themselves.

 

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A very slightly damp e-cloth or computer screen cloth or spectacles cloth is good. I don't recommend using any polishing or other products unless you have got grease or some other type of sadburge on your horn.

For pds use a wet Q tip or run a clean dollar bill or 5 pound note across the pad with the key gently held closed. For sticky pads use lighter fluid. I never use any pad powder or other gunk which I find only works in the short term. However some people have had success with various products.
Believe it or not, when I was first learning music in grade school we were taught that cigareete papers were good forcleaning pads. I suppose in those this was a more common item in the home. We had them, as I recall. Imagine the reaction today if little Johnny came home and said his teacher encouraged the kids to get papers and clean their pads!

I just remembered, we were also shown how to trim the edge of a reed using a lighter. Don't know the musical (or educational) qualifications of the teacher, but that's what we did.
 

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For the body, Windex Glass Cleaner or equivalent works fine. Some guys use Pledge or the equivalent. As far as the pads, I found that the powders gave a temporary solution to sticking and, as the gunk piled up, it made it worse. Some time ago I read an article in The Saxophone Journal by a well known repairman who recommended Neetsfoot Oil. I've been using it ever since (10+ years). No sticking and your pads stay soft. Used wet a cotton swab and lightly coat the pad surface. Just don't over do it. I've used it to cure sticking pads and as a preventative. As far as the hydrocarbon cleaners (lighter fluid, paint thinner, etc.) or alcohols, I would think these would have a tendency to dry out and harden pads over time.
 

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Believe it or not, when I was first learning music in grade school we were taught that cigareete papers were good for cleaning pads.
Yes, they work great for pads that stick. Paper currency, as Pete suggests, works pretty well but it's not as clean as a fresh cigarette paper. I'll use a dollar bill on the gig since I always have some in my wallet (or in the tip jar).
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Yes, they work great for pads that stick. Paper currency, as Pete suggests, works pretty well but it's not as clean as a fresh cigarette paper. I'll use a dollar bill on the gig since I always have some in my wallet (or in the tip jar).
The tip jar? You never know where it's been!

I find that cigarette papers (what we call "*** papers") are likely to break, especially if the pad is damp. But they are great for checking for leaks but you must remove the sticky bit.
 

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As far as the hydrocarbon cleaners (lighter fluid, paint thinner, etc.) or alcohols, I would think these would have a tendency to dry out and harden pads over time.
They don't - I've got a few test pads on my workbench that have been receiving liberal doses of cigarette lighter fluid for years now. They're still looking good, as is the disc of pad leather that's also been under test.
I've also been using the stuff on my own horns, and some of the pads are around 20 years old now and still going strong.


Regards,
 
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