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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a Borgani Vintage Jubilee soprano. The octave is placed underslung and it's regularly getting overflooded with saliva, and therefor blocking the high notes

Have you got the same problem, and have you solved it?

I'm very pleased with the sound, so I would like to stick with it. I'm thinking about the possibility to change the position to overslung. have you got an experience with that?
 

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I've had the same problem with almost every soprano I've owned... I think keeping the soprano raised up or more straight out helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've had the same problem with almost every soprano I've owned... I think keeping the soprano raised up or more straight out helps
Thank you!! I'll see if I can lift it up higher. Really - did you also had problems the ones with the high octave vent at the top?
 

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Yes, yanni , Yamaha and now a mk vi ... I think part of it is the angle my head is at, it's never been an issue playing alto or tenor but when playing soprano my head tends to point downwards... A bit like miles playing trumpet... Also I think when sitting I'm worse...lately I'm trying to keep my chin up 😀
 

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Really had to laugh… thought I was the only one with this problem. What possessed these manufacturers to put the octave vent on the underside of the horn just kind of makes you wonder.

Not to disgress, but the big difference between the Selmer Super Action II and III is not only the difference between the one piece and the two piece, but on the III the octave vent is on the top. Ah, progress.

So, here is how I deal with the problem.
1. Before I blow into the horn I swallow as much saliva as I can. Keeping everything dry as possible. We normally do this anyway, but I put this in the extra effort department -- High equals extra dry.
2. Press open the octave key and blow into the vent hole and blow the moisture out, especially if you know that you are going to go above A in the second octave. (This is also how some flute players do it, apparently they have the same problem.) You can get quite adept at this after a while and be able to perform it in a split second.
3. The horn I have originally had a tube on the inside to prevent the saliva from blocking the vent. It doesn’t take much to knock the small tube out of the horn when you are cleaning it. So, one option it to find a repair person that would be willing to replace the tube (Easier said than done). The trick is to make sure that the tube isn’t that long so one can clean out the horn without knocking the darn tube off of its moorings. The original tube spanned over half of the internal diameter of the horn. Something tells me that amount of tube might be in the overkill department.

Well, that's the latest from here.
 

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2. Press open the octave key and blow into the vent hole and blow the moisture out, especially if you know that you are going to go above A in the second octave. (This is also how some flute players do it, apparently they have the same problem.) You can get quite adept at this after a while and be able to perform it in a split second.
3. The horn I have originally had a tube on the inside to prevent the saliva from blocking the vent. It doesn’t take much to knock the small tube out of the horn when you are cleaning it.
These are true for clarinet, which typically has the octave on the bottom. Yes, if you get moisture in the octave key, blow it out. When swabbing the horn, turn it over so the weight of the swab does not hit the tube. I had a late Conn 10M with an underslung octave that sometimes did this as well. I would try to keep the neck as warm as possible (tucking it under my arm while setting up the horn, or just grabbing it with my hand between songs or during long rests). I thought about having someone knit me a neck cozy, but ended up selling the horn before I got around to it.
 

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I also have this issue with my YAS62, where the octave key is on the top of the neck. Granted, it isn't as big of a problem as having on the bottom of the neck, but it still affects some notes like high A. I just take a small enough piece of paper towel to soak up the saliva that's been building up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Really had to laugh… thought I was the only one with this problem. What possessed these manufacturers to put the octave vent on the underside of the horn just kind of makes you wonder.

Not to disgress, but the big difference between the Selmer Super Action II and III is not only the difference between the one piece and the two piece, but on the III the octave vent is on the top. Ah, progress.

So, here is how I deal with the problem.
1. Before I blow into the horn I swallow as much saliva as I can. Keeping everything dry as possible. We normally do this anyway, but I put this in the extra effort department -- High equals extra dry.
2. Press open the octave key and blow into the vent hole and blow the moisture out, especially if you know that you are going to go above A in the second octave. (This is also how some flute players do it, apparently they have the same problem.) You can get quite adept at this after a while and be able to perform it in a split second.
3. The horn I have originally had a tube on the inside to prevent the saliva from blocking the vent. It doesn’t take much to knock the small tube out of the horn when you are cleaning it. So, one option it to find a repair person that would be willing to replace the tube (Easier said than done). The trick is to make sure that the tube isn’t that long so one can clean out the horn without knocking the darn tube off of its moorings. The original tube spanned over half of the internal diameter of the horn. Something tells me that amount of tube might be in the overkill department.

Well, that's the latest from here.
1. I will think about swallowing the saliva!
2. I blow the moisture out too. I put the big cleaning brush in the horn and tak an A2, to get all the air through the octave vent - and keeping the sax from making a sound. but it is a fast way to do it, but the only way I can get the moisture out.
3. I still got the tube in mine, I've started to use a flute brush to clean around it. I find that it does help some, I guess that different saliva issues build around this tube. The more issues - dinner ;) around the tube, the harder it is to get the saliva past the tube. I think you are right a big tube would cause intonation problems. I have to adjust my octave key with precision - not very open, in order to hit the front key E3 to work. IT DOES NOT MAKE IT EASIER TO GET RID OF THE SALIVA.

Thank you for a detailed answer!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
These are true for clarinet, which typically has the octave on the bottom. Yes, if you get moisture in the octave key, blow it out. When swabbing the horn, turn it over so the weight of the swab does not hit the tube. I had a late Conn 10M with an underslung octave that sometimes did this as well. I would try to keep the neck as warm as possible (tucking it under my arm while setting up the horn, or just grabbing it with my hand between songs or during long rests). I thought about having someone knit me a neck cozy, but ended up selling the horn before I got around to it.
I've got an Conn 6M also with and underslung octave. I don't have any problems with that horn. I guess it is because the vent is so big that the saliva doesn't get stuck. I warm my sop up as much as possible - blowing a lot of air through it before playing. recently I've started to use antikondens like the fluteplayers do, but it is so new that I can'r really say anything conclusive about it. I'm worried that it might make the the little octave tube/vent sticky, and by that collecting saliva issues around it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I also have this issue with my YAS62, where the octave key is on the top of the neck. Granted, it isn't as big of a problem as having on the bottom of the neck, but it still affects some notes like high A. I just take a small enough piece of paper towel to soak up the saliva that's been building up.
I do wonder, if it would solve the problem to get an octave vent installed on top of the sop! That was in the back of my mind when I wrote this thread. But it has to be good!!! before I'll spend a fortune on that. Wonder if someone has had mod made for the sop? I also use a towel to soak up the saliva, I find that is clearly better than not to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you for your answers :) I appreciate that! after all I'm not alone on this matter ;)

It seems like that a high octave vent on the top is not the final solution to the problem
 
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