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yes, that horn has been discussed at length here on a post where the owner of the horn asks for pricing advise.
It is really mangled and in my view only worth something for its parts to a technician willing to put many, many hours of otherwise productive time into salvaging the bell and few other attributes of this horn. The question is does anybody have a Super 20 laying about in need of a Eastlake solid silver bell (putting one on a Cleveland Serial number body tube would scare off any buyer even if the work would look fine)? Unless one has this, there is no point in spending lots of money and many working hours to marginally increase the value of a non silversonic eastlake super 20.
 

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The key would be having someone available that does phenomenal dent removal, so the end result would be worth a bell transplant (if that's the way someone would go). But it's all about someone either having that much time to put into it, or that much money to pay someone else to do the work.

The thing that really bugs me about the idea of bell swapping is that I know some people out there would quickly swap bells, and then flip the horn describing it as a genuine Silver Sonic. I would imagine (but maybe it's just my imagination), the person that has the most to gain by swapping is someone that wants to increase the value of a horn they're already trying to make money on.

It's probably just my own ethical view of it, but I think it's a little shady to call a S20 a Silver Sonic when it didn't originally come with the silver bell. It wouldn't be too dissimilar from taking a body tube from a five digit VI tenor and swapping it out on a late production VI, then saying that it was a five digit tenor, when really only part of it was.

:dontknow:
It's an option for someone to convert their regular S20, or a way for someone to try to make their regular S20 more marketable, but also a way for someone to try to market a non-original horn as being something that it really isn't.
 

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I would not pay 259.00 for that in the condition it is in regardless of its potential! Reserve not met either!
 

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I don't see anybody buying this unless you have a tech who has superior knowledge of restoration but who has a lot of time to dedicate to this project. If such person exists, it might be possible even to restore completely but at what cost in terms of buying the carcass adding many working hours for a relatively low price (how much would anyone pay for a visibly restored horn when very good Eastlake go for not too much ?).

Nobody in his right mind would simply swap a functional brass bell with a silver one (which need a lot of work) just to increase the value of a non silversonic super 20. By the way , it wouldn't be unethical because Silversonics were just Super 20 with a Silver bell but if you were to put a Eastlake silver bell on a Super 20 its value would increase only marginally.
 

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I'd get it. Unfortunately my experience with canada post it's awful. I think it can be restored and you won't notice how bad it was. I once overhauled a selmer BA tenor that had been ran over by a truck and it played and looked perfect.
 

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Yeah but will it ever hold a regulation? I don't imagine those tone holes could ever be leveled out or made true. This one is totally FUBAR if you ask me...tragic indeed for such a fine instrument. But accidents happen. Looks like it got run over by a car.
 

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yes it will hold regulation if properly repaired. It's challenging, it's more work than to manufacture from scratch, it's major surgery so to speak, but's fixable. The key is not being afraid to cut, unbraze, undo, unsolder, separate and "explode" it all before even trying to fix anything.
 

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I'd get it. Unfortunately my experience with canada post it's awful. I think it can be restored and you won't notice how bad it was. I once overhauled a selmer BA tenor that had been ran over by a truck and it played and looked perfect.
Too bad customs regulations in Argentina won't allow you to import used goods. :twisted: That sax is REALLY used.

Yeah but will it ever hold a regulation? I don't imagine those tone holes could ever be leveled out or made true. This one is totally FUBAR if you ask me...tragic indeed for such a fine instrument. But accidents happen. Looks like it got run over by a car.
Once the body tube, the bell bow, and the bell have been un-soldered there are conventional dent tools such as mandrels, dent balls and barrels, rollers, rare earth magnets that can be used to remove the dents in the brass and return the parts to their original shapes. It looks worse than it really is. It should be remembered that a sax is made of a thin layer of brass which is a relatively soft and malleable metal to begin with.

I got a real laugh from the questions people asked the seller:

Q: One more question please. Was this ever used with #3 reeds during marching band season? The cold weather could have affected the pads and might not be worth the cost you are asking to replace the pads.

Q: How does the horn sound when you play it? Does the bend in the bell make the sound more focused and have more projection? Very nice piece.

Q: I could be interested in this - depending on what the price gets to, of course. What would be the postage to United Kingdom? Also, does it have the crook/ neck? Is there a case for it? Which keys are missing?
 

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Too bad customs regulations in Argentina won't allow you to import used goods. :twisted: That sax is REALLY used.
wow, you're loosing your reading/comprehending abilities along with your "craftsmanship" (if you ever had one). Where did I say I'd have it shipped to Argentina?
 

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wow, you're loosing your reading/comprehending abilities along with your "craftsmanship" (if you ever had one). Where did I say I'd have it shipped to Argentina?
Unprofessional personal attacks aside Juan, you wrote in the post quoted below "I'd get it." The plain meaning of that phrase in the English language means that you would buy it on eBay. Your second sentence conveys that you have not had a good experience with goods sent from Canada. If you were to buy the sax to restore as you said you would, where else would you have it shipped but to Argentina where you live and work. By the way, the word is "losing" not "loosing" which means to untie or to loosen.

I'd get it. Unfortunately my experience with canada post it's awful. I think it can be restored and you won't notice how bad it was. I once overhauled a selmer BA tenor that had been ran over by a truck and it played and looked perfect.
 

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Unprofessional personal attacks aside Juan, you wrote in the post quoted below "I'd get it." The plain meaning of that phrase in the English language means that you would buy it on eBay. Your second sentence conveys that you have not had a good experience with goods sent from Canada. If you were to buy the sax to restore as you said you would, where else would you have it shipped but to Argentina where you live and work. By the way, the word is "losing" not "loosing" which means to untie or to loosen.
c'mon bozo, I'd like to see how you do in spanish. You can't even get the name of your latest flint right in english...
 

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The "jazz musician uncle" must have had some crazy psycho girlfriend (for some reason we tend to attract these types) that tried to wrap it around his head. I wonder if it has any pieces of scalp on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
yes, that horn has been discussed at length here on a post where the owner of the horn asks for pricing advise.
It is really mangled and in my view only worth something for its parts to a technician willing to put many, many hours of otherwise productive time into salvaging the bell and few other attributes of this horn. The question is does anybody have a Super 20 laying about in need of a Eastlake solid silver bell (putting one on a Cleveland Serial number body tube would scare off any buyer even if the work would look fine)? Unless one has this, there is no point in spending lots of money and many working hours to marginally increase the value of a non silversonic eastlake super 20.



I dont think the price advice given to him was useful. @$511 US its a tad too much. I just cant imagine how something like that can happen.
 

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well, as usual, it would be nice to see a lot of advisers put their money where their mouth is.....
 

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If anyone recalls, "reason": does not seem to rule the day in auctions like these. There was a VI alto a while back that looked worse than this. Smashed further, missing more keys, and had been thoroughly burned in a fire. It went for around $1400.

In the other thread on this horn I predicted it would go for at least $500 and perhaps up to $1000. The fact that there is a reserve will inhibit the bidding, but the $500 threshold came and went pretty quickly.
 

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c'mon bozo, I'd like to see how you do in spanish. You can't even get the name of your latest flint right in english...
I wonder how a new visitor to this site interprets two "Distinguished Members" going at it in such a nonsensical manner as this. Seriously. And it's not just limited to you two, it seems to be a growing phenomenon.
 
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