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SuperAction80 said:
The keywork has two modifications that I could find. The first being the auxilary F is a metal teardrop on the II opposed to the pearl of the I. The second is the shape of the high F# key. The I has a flat bar design while the II has a key that is the same size except that it is bent like the III's and Reference tenors.
I don't have it in front of me to verify, but I believe that my 1987-ish Series II tenor is actually keyed as you describe the Series I above regarding the high F#...maybe there was some overlap. I haven't seen any issues with acid bleed.
 

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BTW, SuperAction80, I checked my Series II, and I was wrong--it has the angled high F# key, just as you described. I think I was picturing my Mark VII, which has the straight bar on high F#.
 

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captain blowhard said:
I now use a series III neck on the SA80 and it is brighter and less stuffy.
Has anyone compared the size of the octave pip on the series III neck with a series I or II? I'm just wondering if that might have anything to do with the improvements people are seeing.

A tech recently bored out the pip on my Series II neck so that it would match the size of a MKVI pip, and it really seemed to open up the top end of the horn.

It's not a modification I'd suggest that everyone run out and try for themselves because it's irreversible and probably easy to do incorrectly, but I was pleased with the result.

The potential downside is that altering the pip too radically might mess with your intonation. In my case, it didn't "change" the intonation per se, but I would say it made the pitch more "flexible" from A2 on up--if I alter my embouchure, the pitch seems to bend more easily than it used to. To me, this is a good thing, but it might not be for everyone.
 
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