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Discussion Starter #1
I did a wee search but surprisingly didn't come up with much at all for the metal meyer, and from reading what I came up with it seemed the metal meyer is a very unpopular piece. Why exactly is this?
My main piece is a Rubber Meyer 6M, but sometimes I get frustrated with the stuffyness and lack of projection, and wish it was a bit more lively sounding. I've tried many other mouthpieces, (Vandoren Java, Runyon XL, Claude Lakey, Brillhart, Berg Larsen, Selmer C*, Yamaha 4C) but always come back to the meyer because I love the feel of it.
How would the sound of a metal meyer differ from a rubber one? Would it still have the same meyerish sound, but with the added projection and natural brightness of a metal mouthpiece? Or would it just be playing the same mouthpiece in a new coat?
Also, since I love the feel of my meyer, would meyerish mouthpieces such as a Morgan Jazz or a JodyJazz HR* also be good mouthpieces to consider?
Also, since I already love the meyer, to get rid of stuffyness and projection problems, could I try moving up to a 7 and maybe getting a small chamber? Or would the small chamber destroy the round, lush meyer sound?
Sorry, so many questions. But please take me seriously, and if any of my questions have already been answered in other forums that I have not been able to find, I would appreciate getting the web links for them.
Unfortunately I don't live anywhere near a music store where I could go and try a metal meyer out, so any comments/suggestions would be greaty welcome.
Thanks in advance
 

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Be aware that there is little relationship from the rubbber Meyer to the metal Meyer. The metal seems to be a marketing afterthought. I think they are restamped Guy Hawkins or something of that ilk.

So how do you find a Meyer-like mouthpiece with less stuffiness? The very best way is to find a mentor and check out his stuff. At least befriend an older player who can advise you. These guys usually have lots of mps in a drawer and will sell you one that they are not using.

Also, don't expect metal to brighter. A metal Link is actually darker than your Meyer! A Morgan may a good choice. See if you can get one on trial. The Jody Jazz will most likely be darker than you like.

You may wish to consider a bigger mouthpiece and softer reed to get more projection. Go for core not edge. For a great el cheapo setup, try a Rico Royal B7 mouthpiece with a Rico 2 reed. These mouthpieces are quote OK for under $20. Really! I have an A7 which I like. Plays great with very soft reeds.
 

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crescent said:
Be aware that there is little relationship from the rubbber Meyer to the metal Meyer. The metal seems to be a marketing afterthought. I think they are restamped Guy Hawkins or something of that ilk.
That's right. I have both hard rubber Meyer 10M Tenor and Metal Meyer Gold plated 8M Tenor mouthpieces. They both have tips around .104-.105. And that's where the similarity ends.
The metal one is a typical babbit medium/small chamber piece with medium baffle and straight chamber side walls.
I also have a Guy Hawkins 6 metal mouthpiece. The Meyer metal and this Hawkins look like each others and even sound similar.
Very different from the hard rubber Meyer piece.

I also have a hard rubber Link 7* and a metal Link 7 NY. They both are darker than the rubber Meyer.
I would have the rubber Meyer refaced. And maybe opened a bit.
It would cost you less than a new mouthpiece in this quality class.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey thanks very much guys for your responses. So basically what I'm hearing is that the metal is very different from the rubber, ok good to know.
Crescent, you said that the Jody Jazz HR* will likely be too dark for me? It's interesting you say that, because I thought Jody advertises his HR* as "a meyer with more projection and brightness." (sounds too good to be true.!! haha). And thanks for the advice about a bigger tip mouthpiece with a lighter reed, I shall remember that.

Rini, what exactly does a refacer do to mouthpieces? Don't you usually assign them pretty specific tasks, like for ex. a bigger chamber or a bigger baffle? If I were to send my meyer to a refacer, what you recommend I ask to be done on it to achieve what I want? I'm not sure if I would know what to ask for.
Also, Rini you told me to have my meyer opened up a little bit. Could you please explain why in more detail? Is the only thing opening up does is add more projection? Can I do this myself safetly?
Well, maybe I shall check out the Morgan Jazz like Crescent suggested.
Thanks!
 

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Please see below. Many of your questions have been answered on this thred, so hopefully I'm just filling in a few gaps:

My main piece is a Rubber Meyer 6M, but sometimes I get frustrated with the stuffiness and lack of projection, and wish it was a bit more lively sounding.
I just got a refaced Meyer 6M equivalent (5M opened to opened to .76) from Razzy, which was refaced by Adam Niewood, that plays great. No stuffiness whatsoever and seems like it would project well for any jazz setting (I haven't played it yet in an ensemble). Refacing might be the way for you to go.

Also, since I love the feel of my meyer, would meyerish mouthpieces such as a Morgan Jazz or a JodyJazz HR* also be good mouthpieces to consider?
I have a JJ HR* 6 and it's a great mpc. Mine is not darker than other Meyers I've played. If anything, it has a slightly brighter flavour and works very well not only for jazz but for pop (think Spyro Gyro). Also, mine has a slightly lighter quality to it than the Meyers. You are right that it is Meyerish and you wouldn't have any problem adjusting to it.

Also, since I already love the meyer, to get rid of stuffyness and projection problems, could I try moving up to a 7 and maybe getting a small chamber?
I don't think this is the answer to your problems. I would just get it refaced. BTW, you don't have to worry about being too specific with a good refacer as you mentioned. Just tell him, "I get frustrated with the stuffiness and lack of projection, and wish it was a bit more lively sounding". ;)

...if any of my questions have already been answered in other forums that I have not been able to find, I would appreciate getting the web links for them.
Here is a sparse SOTW thread on metal Meyers: http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?t=44662&highlight=metal+meyer Most of the discussion (except mine) refers to tenor mpcs, but you might get a little supplementary info from this.

BTW - I noticed that you are playing a 2.5 reed, and a Plasticover to boot. IMO this is a little weak and would suggest your not only trying a 3.0 but some reeds makes other than what you are playing. I would try this first since it's cheaper and quicker than having it refaced.
 

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Stuffy alternatives

I enjoy the flexibility and the comfort of Meyer mouthpieces, and played them exclusively when I was in the military and for many years to follow. They are very flexible when matched correctly to the horn, and they can be very comfortable in long gigs.

I would go to a shop that has multiple facings and chambers and try the one that works best with your horn.

I have had success with Eugene Rousseau mouthpieces on alto, for their mouthpiece blank is very similar to the Meyer. I use the JDX model for rock work (baffle) on Alto and do not have to use a different brand of reed. Very clear, centered tone, with nice projection.

I had problems with stuffiness when matching a Meyer mouthpiece to my Antigua tenor. I recently purchased a Kessler Custom oL7Pro +2 and am very pleased. It is easily controlled and has a very consistant sound throughout the register. It feels like the Meyer tenor mouthpiece as far as beak is concerned, but the sound is very meaty and flexible.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gary, thanks so much for all the information! I really appreciate it. Sounds like refacing is the way to go. And thanks for the comments on the JodyJazz as well. I shall definitely take it into consideration.
And about moving up to 3 reeds, I have tried, but never liked the sound I was getting from them. Too airy and breathy, I had to work too hard. However it's been about a year since I last tried 3 reeds, so maybe I shall give it another shot. As for different brands, I have tried many cane and synthetic reeds, but always come back to plasticovers. I just like the way they sound, and the extra little grit and clarity they offer to the sound.
jnewmann, I have heard good things about Rousseau. When I get the chance (and more money :) I shall certainly give them a try.
Thanks everyone! I really appreciate all the help this forum always gives me.
 

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saxdude48 said:
And about moving up to 3 reeds, I have tried, but never liked the sound I was getting from them. Too airy and breathy, I had to work too hard.
I'm not an advocate of "who's got the stiffest reed in the neighborhood" mentality, but nevertheless I think a #3 is appropriate for the tip opening you are playing. If it's been a year, then maybe your chops are stronger and you're ready to move up in strength. Give it a try.
 
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